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Thread: Chassis Jig

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Newtown Pa. 18940-1130
    Posts
    39

    Chassis Jig

    Who makes a good simple chassis jig. I'am new at this so by asking questions what to purchase will save me money in the long run.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    95472
    Posts
    556

    ladies and gentlemen....

    ...please give an OWH welcome to

    MISTER

    83

    PITTS

    SiT !!!!!


  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Oxford, Ohio
    Posts
    329

    Thank you, Thank you very much

    Skirk55,

    If you are looking for a jig to scratch build a chassis, they tell me Lucky Bob's is a good one. If you are looking for a jig to Blue Print a chassis, then I sell one called Magna Jiggy. It will align your rear axle perpendiclular with the centerline of the chassis and horizontal to the bottom of your chassis, and set the height for the size tire you want to run. You could use it to scratch build a chassis, but that is not what it was designed to do. The only problem you might have is getting the front axle lined up

    They sell for $19.95 + $4.95 S&H. They also come with a "FREE" Durl's Interior, worth $4.95.

    If you need anymore information, just send me a PM

    Butch
    Everyone has a right to be stupid, but some abuse the privilege

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Rochester, NY USA
    Posts
    202
    skirk55

    I also have a nice simple jig for chassis building..... Based on the old Russkit Adjus-O-jig......

    http://jbriggsk9.tripod.com/id33.html

    Chris

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    62

    Magna Jiggy

    I just Googled "Magna Jiggy" and didn't see any more than I saw here... Doesn't anyone have pics of these posted on a web site?

    Thanks
    Steve
    If I'm not making sense, it's from that time I forgot my helmet! ( |)%b
    Steve Z@tricknologyracing.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Newtown Pa. 18940-1130
    Posts
    39

    chassis jig

    I was hoping to see more photos and what they do.I'am surprised this is all of the replys.There were few scratchbuilders out there.

    I think that the RTR cars look very good but I want a better chassis. I don't see any suspension under $50 and $60 dollar cars. I'am spending alot of time tuning a RTR car. Plus the time it takes to try to locate hop up parts.

    I have spent $1500.00 on my track,table and power supply. Next is to set up my slot car shop in the room that my track is in.I have to purchase tools and materials and I KNOW IT TAKES TIME!

    It is importiant to me to read posts from pro's that work on them. and see what they have made.
    Sam Kirk
    Newtown Pa.
    18940

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    mississippi
    Posts
    554
    My favorite jig right now is a Champion tech block with finishing nails on the underside, used to guide the axles. I push the axles between the nails, line everything up with masking tape, and solder away. When the block gets too nasty, I retire it.

    I like my Lucky Bobs jigs, also, but they are too nice to solder on, I use them just to align and check.

    If I ever get the time to race my wing cars, the Magna Jiggy is great for checking alignment.

    I also have a Champion body mounting block with magnets.

    I wish I had a JBriggs with jig wheels.
    Paul W.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Oxford, Ohio
    Posts
    329
    I sent "thedetailer" a PM on how he can get a Magna Jiggy. The only thing Magna Jiggy does is line up the axle on a stamped steel chassis perpendicular to the center line and horizontal to the bottom of the chassis. It was never designed to build a chassis on, but with the included graph paper you probably could.
    Everyone has a right to be stupid, but some abuse the privilege

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Greenville S.C.
    Posts
    31

    Thumbs up Oh to Jig!!

    I have a Russkit jig that works really good.But they can be hard to find at times .I agree with a few other post here that Jbriggs makes and sells one of the best to be found in todays times.

    Wish I had one.

    I think it comes down to what you become familure with. Any jig once you start using it can be your favorite. The briggs unit is all metal so heat does'nt effect it (same as russkit).

    Scratchbuilders? Their are more builders out their than post on this forum. But some of the best and most helpful will be found here.

    Welcome and good luck. If you have other questions,post them here. Im sure you will get honest replys......C/R
    Carolina Rod

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Lake Stevens, Washington
    Posts
    124

    Chassis Jigs

    Good Morning All,

    skirk55,

    Like pablo, I use an old Champion Jig that I have had since the mid 70's. One side has pre-drilled holes for 0.063 wire to be inserted in to give you BASIC spacing and alingment. The other side is blank so you can drill your own holes.
    I also have a Lucky Bob's Corian jig which is very nice, but, I agree with pablo, too nice to solder on! I received a Magna-Jiggy from Butch a while back and really like it, I use it for setting up my cars.

    I also agree with Carolina Rod that OWH is the place to ask the questions and receive quality advise. However, I would guess that most of us frequent another excellent site, Scratchbuilt.com, maintained by Jim Allen ( who also posts here ). The link is to his article archive which has some great jig articles.
    In addition to the "Scratchbuilding" forum here at OWH don't forget to look in the "Vintage" forum here. The "Scratchbuilding" forum spun off from the "Vintage" forum a few months ago. Some of us post old magazine articles about chassis, motor, and car building written by some of the best builders, Lee Gilbert, PdL ( aka Dokk ), Jon Skeels, and others.

    Be Good,
    kkjva
    K. L. VanAtta

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,789
    "I wish I had a JBriggs with jig wheels."

    Pablo, I bet Chris wishes you had one too! Last I heard he was still selling both items. They'd be ideal for use with your torch. Chris's website is : http://jbriggsk9.tripod.com/index.html

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Toronto Ontario Canada
    Posts
    674
    Here's one I built for building a specific chassis, namely my Brass Tube n Billit Bracket Trombone chassis.





    After torching a couple hundred chassis together in this thing, it is not nearly as shiney, but, it still works great.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Central Coast CA.
    Posts
    934

    Talking Never had a jig!

    Who needs a stinking jig man?
    Just kidding guys.

    I could not afford a Russkit jig when they first came out, I was going back to school. So I got an old chunk of hard oak I made a test block out of and made it all square in the JR college shop. Then I saw cut a slot in it length wise and layed out square cross lines with a tri square, scribed, then inked the lines across it for front an rear axle locations. As I built them starting from the rear forward the front.

    After a few years I had too many scribed lines and made a new block every few years for cheap. Always checked my axle aligment with a pair of calipers I had from my tool maker days. My jig wheels were the ones to be used on the car as I built it.

    Still working for a few years now since 1963. Old Pharts always do it the hard way you know.
    Converting the slot car world one scratch built at a time.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Toronto Ontario Canada
    Posts
    674
    Actually, I never used a jig at all for any of my building untill maybe about 3 years ago.

    Was always gonna build one, but never did.

    I mostly use throw away ones out of wood, although, so far I havn't thrown any of them out yet.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Irvine, CA
    Posts
    309
    I build mostly in 1/32 scale, so my jig of choice is the SCD jig from the UK:



    It's nice and flat, made of (I think) asbestos, believe it or not, and comes with a bunch of predrilled holes and stainless steel pins to fit, as well as a 3/16 brass rod for the guide. Multiple wheelbases, axle pins are spaced for 3/32 axles. These jigs have been on the market since probably the late 1960's!
    Dennis Samson

    Scratchbuilding is life
    Life is scratchbuilt

    Samson Classics

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