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Thread: Chassis Tuning

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,162

    Question Chassis Tuning

    Lee, I think your eurosports are the best thing on the market right now, but recently I have found that to get the most out of my car, I need to learn how to tune it at the track . Your job is building, my job is tuning, giving accurate feedback, and driving! What kind of suggestions can you share with us?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    332

    More Black Magic

    Hi George

    Chassis tuning is not all the difficult. The first problem I have noticed in cars I have received for rebuilds is high front ends. Scale slot cars ride on the front of the chassis and how hard the chassis touches the track determines how much bite and stability you will have in turns. If you car has too much clearance under the front you will have less bite and less stability. For most tracks I like to have between .005 and .010 inch under the front ( with braid) while the car sits on your flat set up block. Many racers see black tire buildup under the front of their car and assume the car is too low. Not so! I you don't see black tire buildup you are too high. Of course you can be too low also. When you are too low your car will have braid contact problems and your chassis will tend to dig in on the turns. You can adjust bite by adding what Speedshop calls "pads". Pads are small pieces of Speedshop bullet proofing added to the front ears of you chassis. This lowers the front of the chassis and increases bite. When the track is loose or green pads can increase your bite. At the same time pads increase bite they will make you car less forgiving. No problem when the track is green but when the bite comes up we tend to remove the pads for better braid contact and forgivingness.

    The second area to work on is your front to back weight distribution. Every car wants a certain weight distribution and the only way to find it is through trial and error. This means you need to add some weight on the front and see what happens. On Speedshop chassis we add two pieces of lead where the front wheels should go. We use either sticker fronts of body mounted front wheels so there is plenty of room for lead. If the car works better good, if not take the lead back off. With a moveable pan type chassis like a Horky 1/32 Euro you can also try some lead on the pans. Speedshop runs a small piece of lead in the front center on our Horkeys with no lead on the pans.

    The last big area is body mounting. On most scale cars you want to mount your body as high as the rules allow (no higher then 1 3/4 inch) and as far back as your chassis allows. This will give you the most traction and that's what we are looking for.

    Start with these basics and keep working with trial and error and you may find that "sweet" spot that everyone is seeking.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,162
    These are all guidelines I think I can work with. You're right, it doesn't sound all that difficult. I have a test session planned for tomorrow at my local track that just had a big race. No birthday parties scheduled for the flat track so it's available 1pm-5pm, and a Krush Burger is waiting at the end of the day. So, with the Speedshop chassis, what I am hearing you say is to work on three areas. First, front end height. Second, weight which is usually just a few small tabs of lead, and third a high body mount. Tomorrow we'll start out by setting up the front of the cars. Thanks!
    Last edited by fxgeorge; 05-03-2008 at 09:54 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    fairfield ca.
    Posts
    339

    see you there there!!!

    i will be meeting up with george as a second pair of eye so we can compare notes. test ,test and more testing is the way to achieve success.
    herman

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,162
    Herman is forgetting that 1/2 the key to achieve success is to test, test and more testing, but the other 1/2 is food, and in this case the Mike's At The Crossroads Krush Burger is, in fact, 1/2 the key to achieve success. Keep in mind that when in Chicago at Miss America Speedway, the 1/2 key to success is the Gugu Cheeseburger from next door. See ya at Frank's Topkat.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Auburn,Wa
    Posts
    1,640

    Test test test fate hands you a trump pinki take it...

    George:

    Yes food has it advantages when tuning a chassis. I found that on an empty stomach my mind goes numb as well as my fingers but thats a nother story. Ask Kevin, Jedi, and Peter about the 3 am Jack n the Box incident.

    as your testing you may accidently come across something new....

    In this case accidents are a thing of redirection to another thought in the right direction.

    Oh by the way George Test, Tune ,Test and do more testing....then eat when testing no further or hunger sets in.

    Raymond
    Last edited by Slapshot; 05-08-2008 at 05:59 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Central California
    Posts
    11
    Lee,
    I have a question about how to set your front ride height. You say to do it on your flat block and check the height. The question I have is do you do that with the car setting there or by pressing down on the front end I guess to simulate how the car will be during the race.

    Brandon

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    332

    Front End Height

    Hi Brandon,

    When I set the front height I slip a pair of braid under the guide. If I think the front is too high I then sand the bottom of the guide until I get the height I want. Some cars will need a cut down guide to be low enough. When you are testing on the track you can tune the front by putting in or taking out .005 spacers to get it just right.

    Lee

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    42
    Can you explain this?
    "The last big area is body mounting. On most scale cars you want to mount your body as high as the rules allow (no higher then 1 3/4 inch) and as far back as your chassis allows. This will give you the most traction and that's what we are looking for. "

    as high? overall, in the back, or the front? We don't run high-down-force bodies but they are pretty squashed. I've always tried to mount them as low as possible (at least in the front) and about normal height in the rear. Is this wrong?

    what's the theory here?

    Thanks!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    332

    Body Mounting

    As I said before the higher your body is mounted the more traction your car will have. Of course that does not mean the front because any extra height in the front will tend to pull the guide out of the slot. For todays scale racing we mount most of our bodies at 1 5/8th inches at the back spoiler. If your rules allow I would mount a Flexi car body a little higher. Flexi cars need more bite so we tend to run a littler higher body with the big rim (490). If you are racing slower classes such as Falcons then a little lower (1 1/5 inch) body works better. The slower the car the less traction they need. Also when we mount scale bodies we mount them as far back as possible for the best traction.

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