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Thread: baking epoxy

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    mechanicsville Virginia
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    364

    baking epoxy

    Calling all Epoxy experts Monty and beyond.

    Regarding Koford heat curing epoxy: is it possible to skip the oven and simply heat the prepaired can gently with a small torch.

    I figure it takes an hour in the oven because air is a poor heat conductor. While a torch can bring the heat in a minute or less.

    How critical is the temperature? Can't you just heat the can until you see the epoxy under go a viscosity change or does it really have to cure at 350 for some time?

    (Don't worry Steve...I'll use her damn oven...if someone will just tell me the torch is a bad idea)
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    New Jersey
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    Its takes an hour and half in oven for full cure .I take mags out with torch don't think you can cure with torch can't regulate heat . Torch will just burn epoxy away
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Auburn,Wa
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    Do not try to fast cure via your method.

    It makes the cure brittle or inconsistant near the can part. It is hard to not keep a consistant temperature baking via torch. It can cause tiny bubbles in the epoxy if done incorrectly which lead to early glue failure when you least expect it. Since the glue is a one part epoxy it needs a reasonable amount of extended time to cure and internally react with itself.

    Leave the tourch for removing the magnets when you break a magnet and have to remove from can. Catch my drift....

    Tip go down to your local Thrift shop like Goodwill and aquire a used $5-10.00 toaster oven. They are small and have a varable temp adjustment in the 200-400 range needed. I usually go about 25 degree under or about the recommended temp and bake somewhat longer. The small space concentrates the heat to a more condined area so the baking is more consistant.

    Raymond
    Last edited by Slapshot; 11-21-2010 at 08:39 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3,394
    As Slapshot mentioned the torch is for removing magnets.

    Whatever oven you go with, invest $10 or so on a separate oven thermometer
    so you can dial in the heat as close as possible to the recommended cure temp.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin
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    I would listen to Mike . With all the years he worked for Koford he would be and is a great resorce on all things Koford.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Victorville, CA
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    1,725
    +1 for Swiss. I use a cheap toaster oven and a $6.99 oven thermometer from the market. I use it for curing armatures, C cans, Cobalts with Skinner's, and even the hysol insulation on the arm blanks. Each application is a slightly different temp (hysol goes 450!).

    Whatever you have in the oven gets up to temperature in just a few minutes.

    The torch can be used for magnet removal, but consider the ballbearing a loss as well if you use it.
    A clean slotcar is a happy slotcar!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Auburn,Wa
    Posts
    1,640
    Sorry Monty i replied early not looking it was in your forum....

    The oven thremo is a great idea Mike...

    Monty when I toast and torch out magnets I could unsolder the bearing first and save but I figure it's time for some "Best of the West" bearing to replace them any ways. Anything that will crack a magnet with enough force will usually fatigue the bearings and usuallaly you find out when you leading the next race and goodby new magnets..... Thats something Lee taught me a long time ago and I've followed that theme since.

    If I recall my magnet glue lecture the one part glue has a internal catialist that is activated by the recommended tempature too hot will overcure (brittle) and to low will not cure enough (softy) or something along that line. Its been two decades since my magnet glue school days.....

    Insert B/W or Kofrod bearing sales plug here.

    Raymond
    Last edited by Slapshot; 11-22-2010 at 03:17 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    New Bethlehem, PA
    Posts
    26

    glueing magnets

    Sorry to ask, but I am sure in here I can find some info. on how to glue magnets in? I have not looked all over yet, but will if needed. I have a parma motor that got whacked last week and when I tore motor down, it had a loose magnet. Can anyone tell me how to glue it in? And should I remve the other one and re-glue it also? Or should I just buy a new motor?
    Thx

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    mechanicsville Virginia
    Posts
    364
    Sounds like Raymond has tired it....

    Alright guys thanks for posting up. I'll fire up the oven.
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

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