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Thread: Slot Car Racer Today

  1. #1156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slotcar Racer View Post
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    SR do you have a link to a site for this new controller or is it just word of mouth right now?
    Casey Scott

    Team Camen - PK Armatures

    www.theisrausa.com

  2. #1157
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    Casey, you'd have to contact Dave Harvey at Won O Won in the UK for availability. My understanding currently is that it is available in limited quantities and a long wait. I'll try it out this weekend and see how I like it. I tried the Pro 3 and when it was working, it worked well. I wasn't crazy about the build quality though which is ultimately why I went back to the Verdo Speedshop design.
    Journeyman Industrial Slotcar Worker, Teamsters Local 3299 AFL-CIO
    Now with "Improved Karma"

  3. #1158
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berteinstein View Post
    Yea- that was my next guess- the old 2n5686 PNP Niner Roger Copy That Over

    SR- Is that controller going to be on display at the upcoming NORCAL/SCRA season opener at the WORLD famous Slotcar Raceway in Rohnert Park?

    Jasn
    Jasn, Raymond's information completely agreed with my assessment of the electronic complexity of the appliance in question. Also having reviewed his attached pdf file it verifies the reasoning behind this highly engineered design. I just wish he'd keep his Ps and Ns straight even if he is sleep deprived. You could get seriously injured if you get one of those things out of order.

    As for display on Sept 10th, not sure if it will be on display or pressed into C Can service. I suspect I might be using it as I find the Speedshop troller is great for eurosport, but controllers like this Budgie are best for the lower classes....still need to test it and evaluate it this Saturday.
    Journeyman Industrial Slotcar Worker, Teamsters Local 3299 AFL-CIO
    Now with "Improved Karma"

  4. #1159
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    While this might be a great controller, I personally would not like it. I want a controller that will work with any car I pick up by just adjusting the controller. Having chips you have to change doesn't fit that criteria.

    My old Speedshops are VERY good controllers and fit that criteria. In fact, I've used them from HO cars all the way to Opens. My new 3rd Eye FETroller also seems to fit that criteria though I haven't tried it with HO or 32nd scale plastic cars yet. I especially like the choke on the FET.

    George, Why don't you like the Speedshop for the slower classes?
    Gary Johnson

  5. #1160
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearBear View Post
    While this might be a great controller, I personally would not like it. I want a controller that will work with any car I pick up by just adjusting the controller. Having chips you have to change doesn't fit that criteria.

    My old Speedshops are VERY good controllers and fit that criteria. In fact, I've used them from HO cars all the way to Opens. My new 3rd Eye FETroller also seems to fit that criteria though I haven't tried it with HO or 32nd scale plastic cars yet. I especially like the choke on the FET.

    George, Why don't you like the Speedshop for the slower classes?
    I've been using Peter Verdo's old Speedshop controller for everything for the past two years and it works very well. I have an orange handled Speedshop controller that I only use for 1/32 F1, also very good. I'm not convinced I am getting everything out of my cars with these controllers though, but I might be wrong. I'm willing to spend some money to experiment with stuff though. Your point about the chip is a really good one Gary, I agree with you to a point. I think with these multi chip controllers, most racers end up using just one chip anyway...they find their "favorite number" and stick with it. I know that the high numbers won't be to my liking, I prefer more sensitivity.

    The other thing about the Carsteen, the FET, and the Czech controller is something Hermanator and I have discussed a number of times. We both can hear a higher pitch from the motor on the main chute when using one of the above controllers....higher than with a Speedshop. Hermanator has said something to the effect that the other controllers seem more efficient and deliver more peak power. The argument against that is that the Speedshop has a full power relay, so full power is full power.

    I used to drive a Carsteen for the lower classes and my subjective experience was faster than my Speedshop. I have always liked the feel of the Speedshop with a 1/24 Eurosport....pretty brain dead to drive. I did some extensive testing with Hermanator with the FET controller and we both found it was kind of unwieldy feeling...kind of felt "out of control". Of course here's the deal....whatever controller you choose, you will get used to it and it will work fine. Anything takes practice.
    Journeyman Industrial Slotcar Worker, Teamsters Local 3299 AFL-CIO
    Now with "Improved Karma"

  6. #1161
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    I dont agree on the one chip thing. Every motor is a bit different. I have a B-production car that i use a 32 chip on and a 12 that i use the 62 chip on and the other b-production car i use a 80 chip and falcons i use the 90 or 127 chip.

    It is different motor. The nice thing with the chip is you can dial in the car with the chip and the sen set at 5 and use the sen to go up and down depending on what lane your on.

    Over time there is no problem with using differnet chips.
    Michael Mazur
    Ruzam Racing
    Team ProSlot

  7. #1162
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    I agree with Michael on this. I generally use 5 different chips in my controller depending on the car I'm driving.

  8. #1163
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    Maybe it is just me and my failing memory, but I find the chips a royal pain. I have an EXTREMELY nice HD30 Genesis controller that works awesome for lower class cars. I spent many hours trying to get it set to just the way I like it for those cars by fine tuning the resistors on the chip. Then I started working on getting another set tuned for GT12. Again I got it to feel awesome. But I found that I just don't like having to change the chips when I change cars. I never really got it to work for me for Eurosport. It just never felt right. I know I could eventually get it to where I like it, but since it doesn't have a built in choke I decided that for the faster classes I would go with a different controller.

    The week before I left for the Nats PSCR got in 3 FETrollers. When I hooked one up and tried it with the 1/32 Euro, I was sold. However it did take me quite a while to get used to it as it had a much different feel than my old Speedshop and the Genesis (that I tuned to feel like my Speedshop ). The first thing I noticed is that it had WAY more brakes than any of my other controllers. Second was that the choke was different than my inductance choke on my Speedshop. Next was that the throttle response was very similar to the Speedshop, but the sensitivity setting was VERY touchy.

    I've since had to send the controller to Howard to have some service done on it as it died on me just before the Flats. After talking with him he went way above and beyond what I expected and tweaked it to make the sensitivity adjustment suit me better and it is now about the only controller I use.
    Gary Johnson

  9. #1164
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    Gary,

    What did you do to "tune" your Genesis to feel like your Speedshop?? I just had my 10 band Difalco upgraded and have the resistors and blocks to play with more options...

    Thanks,

  10. #1165
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    Check out this thread. I have the settings I used. Actually a straight linear block is pretty good, but I felt softening up the bottom and quickening the top felt better.
    Gary Johnson

  11. #1166
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    This is all really great controller stuff, thanks for the suggestions and insights, it's going to help me on Saturday when I mess around with my Budgie.

    This is just an observation, I have seen a wide variation in how drivers use their controllers. Some are constantly turning the knobs and fidgeting with it whereas others seem to just wait for the power to come on and they leave the knobs alone.

    In the eye vision business we have two basic types, the "sharpener" who needs ultra sharp clarity....basically, they're pretty fussy personalities. The other is the "levellor" who is quite easy going, adapts to things more readily, expectations not so high.

    I think there is a correlation with the use of slotcar controllers...there are those who can drive with anything, not very concerned with the details of how it feels....those are people who can drive with a Parma Turbo controller and whip the butts of the guys driving the Carsteen..don't you hate that?!?!? Then there are those who think they can hear the grass grow, think they can feel the difference between a 2.1 and a 2.2 (whatever that means) and think that it is IMPORTANT to feel the TINIEST difference.

    What I am struggling to say in an overly complicated way is that slotcar controllers are a very individualized tool. The controller is connected to the finger bone, the finger bone is connected to the brain bone, the brain bone is connected to the eye bone. The brain bone works differently for different folks. In the above discussion some prefer a one setting fits all approach, others like to make the most minute adjustments. Nothing wrong with either way. The only thing that WOULD be wrong is to expect everybody to approach it identically. I just feel like pointing that out.
    Journeyman Industrial Slotcar Worker, Teamsters Local 3299 AFL-CIO
    Now with "Improved Karma"

  12. #1167
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    What I am struggling to say in an overly complicated way is that slotcar controllers are a very individualized tool. The controller is connected to the finger bone, the finger bone is connected to the brain bone, the brain bone is connected to the eye bone. The brain bone works differently for different folks. In the above discussion some prefer a one setting fits all approach, others like to make the most minute adjustments. Nothing wrong with either way. The only thing that WOULD be wrong is to expect everybody to approach it identically. I just feel like pointing that out.
    Amen to that George! Controllers are VERY much a personalized item. What works for me doesn't work for others and vice versa. Case in point, Lee was doing some testing with a Euro a few weeks ago. When he asked me to try it his controller was set so different from what I like that it took me several laps before I felt comfortable with it. This made me take a while to get a feel for what the car was doing. On the flip side, when I first got the 3rd Eye Lee tried it and couldn't stand it. He couldn't find a setting that suited his driving style. So as you said, each person will have different controller settings to suit their driving styles.

    Also, while the Difalco's are great controllers, the power band that Jim typically ships with them just doesn't suit my driving style. I grew up driving with Parma Turbo's and then when I started racing again I got the Speedshop Linear. So I am used to a very linear response out of a controller. The quick ramping of power that the stock Difalco's have had just doesn't fit my driving style.
    Gary Johnson

  13. #1168
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    Nov 2003
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    Reno
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slotcar Racer View Post
    . The argument against that is that the Speedshop has a full power relay, so full power is full power.
    Raymond- is there a test for this? I hear the clicking sound at full pull, but am I really getting full power???? I have always felt the same way on my Speedshop controller- I do not notice it on the eurosport as there is always a faster motor I can stick into the car.... the C-can stuff I am still wanting MORE motor just to be even with everybody else....

    Jasn
    Asking all things relevant-

  14. #1169
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    May 2003
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    Great Valley,NY
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    I just upgraded last year from a Parma Turbo to a used 15 Band Difalco.
    The brakes went bad so I bit the bullet at the D2 Nats and bought a new Genesis.
    Starting to play around with the chips. Will report on my progress.

    Just sent the old 15 Band back to Jim yesterday for a new Pro Rheostat.
    I won some races with that controller last year so will use it as a Backup or sell it.

    I don`t know if I`m good enough to tell the difference or not, to tell you the truth.
    I think it`s more in building a fast car.
    The faster your car, the easier you have to drive it, in my humble opinion.

    It also helps to get some sleep the night before the race.
    A good night`s sleep, and a fast motor go a long way for me.
    Last edited by La Cucaracha; 08-31-2011 at 08:39 PM.

  15. #1170
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    Denmark
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    B]Full power test[/B]

    is easily done: hook the controller up to a power supply that is able to supply beaucoup de current, i.e 10A.
    Connect a resistor from the output of the controller (black) to ground (0V, red on the controller.
    The resistor should be appx 1,2 ohm to achieve a 10A current. Be aware that these 10A would casue the resistor to dissipate more than 120W, which will make it hot. Using a current of 5A (by using a resistor of 2,4 ohm) would casue the dissipation to go down to 60W, which would still make the resistor HOT. A light-bulb from a car can be used, but tyou would need to find out how much current it draw from 12V.
    If you only want to compare controllers, but are uninterested in the precise actual value, you can use a light bulb from the headlights of a car. Hook the bulb up instead of the resistor.
    Squeeze the controller, with all choke-setting turned to zero. in short: full power
    Measure the voltage-drop across the controller, by measuring the voltage betwen white and black.
    The voltage drop is a measure of the internal resistance of the controller. The very best controllers out there has an internal resistance of less than 0,005 ohm, but many have as much as 0,02 ohm or more. Output resistance is voltage drop divided by current, say 0,1V divided by a current of 10A equals 0,01 ohm.
    Short (and thick) wires to the drivers panel and new strong relays are important. Or the use of FET's with ample current capacity.

    Be aware, though, that maximum power is only one small part of the total performance of a controller. A well worn Pro-2 might have more than 0,02 ohm, but it is still the controller of choice for many racers.

    Steen

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