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Thread: Slot Car Racer Today

  1. #1276
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Richmond, CA
    Posts
    1,279
    I arrived at Fast Tracks (I think that's what it's called.....everybody just calls it "Rocklin") which was in a pretty nice shopping center. The store is a full service hobby shop with a lot of R/C. The slot car tracks are in the rear of the store, and when I arrived Ryan "Vegas" McDaniel was practicing on the green lane of the flat track. There was a large birthday party in progress on the banked track, the Purple Angel.

    I was warned to take my Ottlite, and a good thing. The ceilings are all black and there is minimal flourescent lighting in the store. I bought a track card, only $30 for five hours, and started off with one hour on red. The track was in really good condition, not loose like I thought it might be. All my LMP cars were running in the 4.2-4.3 second range on red, best times 4.22 a number of times. Just couldn't get that 4.1, but I got in a lot of practice.

    The GT12 got down to a 3.88 on red, but pretty much running 3.9s and 4.0s consistently.

    Later, we had company on the track, a couple of kids aged around 10 and 12. This was great to see young people enjoying slotcar racing! They had wing cars and Ryan and I had no problems with the kids on the track, we pretty much kept pounding the track practicing.

    Later in the afternoon I moved down to black and it wasn't hard to get used to it. Great lane in fact. The LMP got down to 3.88 and the GT12 down to 3.65 and that was as good as I could get on black.

    I learned some things I need to do in terms of set up, but pretty much I have the same two cars I ran at Rohnert Park, the 2009 Bulldog and the two piece X25 chassis. Both cars very smooth. I couldn't get the Bulldog 3 to settle down although it ran good lap times. Same with the three piece X25s and the one remaining C11.

    Next week is retro cars in Rocklin, and then the following week (October 1st) is the NORCAL race.
    Journeyman Industrial Slotcar Worker, Teamsters Local 3299 AFL-CIO
    Now with "Improved Karma"

  2. #1277
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    701
    Sr,

    Thanks for sharing the photo's of the Hermanator Factory. The only thing missing was a picture of the glue sniffing..... errr, I mean tire gluing area.

  3. #1278
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Land of Excitement "Bensenville"
    Posts
    1,326
    Why is the water green or is just me.
    Michael Mazur
    Ruzam Racing
    Team ProSlot

  4. #1279
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    701
    When my daughters were younger, I told them it would only turn green if they or their friends were peeing in the water. Herman!!!!!

  5. #1280
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Cleveland, TN
    Posts
    709
    Quote Originally Posted by mazur50 View Post
    Why is the water green or is just me.
    Ya gotta rinse the glue out somewhere
    Alan Ingram

  6. #1281
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Cleveland, TN
    Posts
    709
    Quote Originally Posted by Slotcar Racer View Post
    I arrived at Fast Tracks (I think that's what it's called.....everybody just calls it "Rocklin") which was in a pretty nice shopping center. The store is a full service hobby shop with a lot of R/C. The slot car tracks are in the rear of the store, and when I arrived Ryan "Vegas" McDaniel was practicing on the green lane of the flat track. There was a large birthday party in progress on the banked track, the Purple Angel.

    I was warned to take my Ottlite, and a good thing. The ceilings are all black and there is minimal flourescent lighting in the store. I bought a track card, only $30 for five hours, and started off with one hour on red. The track was in really good condition, not loose like I thought it might be. All my LMP cars were running in the 4.2-4.3 second range on red, best times 4.22 a number of times. Just couldn't get that 4.1, but I got in a lot of practice.

    The GT12 got down to a 3.88 on red, but pretty much running 3.9s and 4.0s consistently.

    Later, we had company on the track, a couple of kids aged around 10 and 12. This was great to see young people enjoying slotcar racing! They had wing cars and Ryan and I had no problems with the kids on the track, we pretty much kept pounding the track practicing.

    Later in the afternoon I moved down to black and it wasn't hard to get used to it. Great lane in fact. The LMP got down to 3.88 and the GT12 down to 3.65 and that was as good as I could get on black.

    I learned some things I need to do in terms of set up, but pretty much I have the same two cars I ran at Rohnert Park, the 2009 Bulldog and the two piece X25 chassis. Both cars very smooth. I couldn't get the Bulldog 3 to settle down although it ran good lap times. Same with the three piece X25s and the one remaining C11.

    Next week is retro cars in Rocklin, and then the following week (October 1st) is the NORCAL race.
    Thanks for the report. 3.8's for LMP are good considering last NorCal best times were in the low 4's and Purple is typically faster than Black.

    Hopefully the NorCal Retro F1 race next week will make the track even better but I thought it was pretty good Saturday night.
    Alan Ingram

  7. #1282
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Fall City, WA
    Posts
    1,364
    Those tire cutting machines look pretty awesome! What are the grinding wheels made out of? IE: How difficult it is to make the grinding wheels? I think I can easily make up the rest of the machine, but cutting the grinding wheel accurately is going to be the hard part.

    Sounds like you really have the MTT style tracks down George! I hope I can make a trip south for a practice race before running the Nats at Franks! I really need to get some time on the track!

    Sure looking forward to racing on the Canadian White next month!
    Gary Johnson

  8. #1283
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Victorville, CA
    Posts
    1,725
    Gary,

    That particular machine has a 100 grit 8" aluminum oxide stone. The profile is hand cut with a series of diamond tools. When close, you grind a lot of popsicle sticks to visualize the profile, while making adjustments. Took me approx. 3 hours to shape. Luckily, unless it eats a wheel, the stone will last for years.

    Don't be too sure you could easily make the rest of the machine. That heavy duty encased ballbearing machine slide holding the tire drive motor ain't so easy to come by, and the adapter from that motor to the 3mm hudy shaft was a PITA also since the drive motor has a left hand threaded shaft.

    Herman added the clear plastic shielding, nice touch!
    A clean slotcar is a happy slotcar!!

  9. #1284
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    TEXAS
    Posts
    329
    You can go to a Machine Shop that does tool grinding and they can cut the grinding stone to shape complete with radius and both sides just give them a stone and a tire as example they will match it. For cutting tires .900 wide you will need a Norton stone 1 1/4" wide x 7 or 8" diameter(difficult to find) My stone is 60 Grit and has worked well for over 20 years.
    An alternative to the small little motors shown to mount tires on is a Sewing Machine Motor which you can buy off of Ebay. An alternative to BB slide is a pivot arm(mine is 1/2 x 1 1/2 aluminum 18" long) with a bushing with an adjustable stop( to change the tire size) mount the sewing machine motor to pivot arm. If you cut a hole in the back of the Grinding wheel cover and mount a 5 Gallon Shop Vacuum(Walmart $80) it will suck the tire dust out and eliminate the majority of the mess.

  10. #1285
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Richmond, CA
    Posts
    1,279
    Quote Originally Posted by GearBear View Post
    Those tire cutting machines look pretty awesome! What are the grinding wheels made out of? IE: How difficult it is to make the grinding wheels? I think I can easily make up the rest of the machine, but cutting the grinding wheel accurately is going to be the hard part.

    Sounds like you really have the MTT style tracks down George! I hope I can make a trip south for a practice race before running the Nats at Franks! I really need to get some time on the track!

    Sure looking forward to racing on the Canadian White next month!
    Gary, the tire machines at the Hermanator Assembly Plant are the kind used by Alpha, JK, etc all the major tire fabricators. That is a cutting stone pretty much like a grinding wheel. Very heavy. Not so much the speed the wheel turns, it has so much momentum. When you move the tire/donut on the stone, it is a take no prisoners situation, it just buzzes the rubber away really quickly. The tire is mounted on a smaller motor which turns at a high rpm. This is the way to do mass marketed slotcar tires. Monty has more details above, he's the guy who built the thing, and as usual a very nice job of building.

    As for the MTT style track, the one in Rocklin drives a lot like the track at Buena Park. The track at Buena Park is the first flat track I ever raced on when it was at its original location in Pleasant Hill, CA. Just a lot of seat time on this type of track. Hasse built a number of them in the Bay Area in the early to mid 90s. My own MTT style track built by the Tunkels also had an uphill donut. This was a ubiquitous design in the mid 90s.
    Journeyman Industrial Slotcar Worker, Teamsters Local 3299 AFL-CIO
    Now with "Improved Karma"

  11. #1286
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Richmond, CA
    Posts
    1,279
    Started to rebuild a couple of 16D motors for my friend John last night. These have been NORCAL motors that have been through many wars. The arms had plenty of comm left, so my freshly Liebenthal-tuned comm truer made those comms nice and shiny and round. The bearings in the set ups were shot....actually, they were beyond shot. Put the set ups in the ultrasonic cleaner and this dislodged the magnets as they were only loctited in. No worries, time to get out the Skinner Epoxy. I think the stink of the glue was gone by 11:30pm when wife returned from work in The City. Reviewing the Skinner Epoxy situation, I use the toaster oven I bought at COSTCO in 1995 for my raceway to glue in magnets, and we keep this in the kitchen. I'm too cheap to buy another one for the garage. Anyway, tonight I need to solder in the new bearings with alignment tool. Both set ups have .580" air gaps which seems to work really well with the .560" arms....but, what do I know about 16D motors???? Well, I guess I know just a little more now.... Uh oh, time to get to "work"
    Journeyman Industrial Slotcar Worker, Teamsters Local 3299 AFL-CIO
    Now with "Improved Karma"

  12. #1287
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    NorthWesterner now in Philippines
    Posts
    9,535
    That tire machine looks very nice. I can see that the old one was the current workhorse by the tire dust. The BOW machine looks brand spanking new. It lokks very cool - and I especially like the plexi shield on it.

    TNT posted some great ideas. My uncle used to get old sewing machines and turn them into mini-lathes... so I have often thought about using a sewing machine motor to make a tire grinder. I would love to do it... but now days it sounds like a lot of work!

    I got to see the Parma tire machine when I took a factory tour back in 2003, but they would not let me take pictures of it. It had a similar grinding wheel, but the tires were mounted on a revolving carousel with an automated rotation. Very slick setup!

    I've watched Lee Gilbert make tires many times. Lee is just not into automation and reminds me of an old cobbler or shoe maker - everything is done by hand one step at a time. I spent over 25 years as an Industrial Engineer in manufacturing, so I used to bug Lee about automating some of his processes. Then he would show me how he could do things by hand faster then you could if it was automated. Kinda hard to teach an old dog new tricks, especially if the old dog is a master of the old tricks!

    I guess my past experience in manufacturing makes me always fascinated to see how other people make products, and especially to see how the products are made for my hobby (as opposed to when it was my job in the sewing business).

    It is fun to see how they do it - and I also used to be much more into being a do-it-yourself-er... but it also lets those of us who do not have the time, expertise, or equipment, to appreciate what goes into making the products that we buy.

    Paul K
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Paul Kassens
    OWH Slot Car Talk "Mom"
    The Old Weird Herald
    email: paulk@oldweirdherald.com

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  13. #1288
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Land of Excitement "Bensenville"
    Posts
    1,326
    Quote Originally Posted by Slotcar Racer View Post
    Started to rebuild a couple of 16D motors for my friend John last night. These have been NORCAL motors that have been through many wars. The arms had plenty of comm left, so my freshly Liebenthal-tuned comm truer made those comms nice and shiny and round. The bearings in the set ups were shot....actually, they were beyond shot. Put the set ups in the ultrasonic cleaner and this dislodged the magnets as they were only loctited in. No worries, time to get out the Skinner Epoxy. I think the stink of the glue was gone by 11:30pm when wife returned from work in The City. Reviewing the Skinner Epoxy situation, I use the toaster oven I bought at COSTCO in 1995 for my raceway to glue in magnets, and we keep this in the kitchen. I'm too cheap to buy another one for the garage. Anyway, tonight I need to solder in the new bearings with alignment tool. Both set ups have .580" air gaps which seems to work really well with the .560" arms....but, what do I know about 16D motors???? Well, I guess I know just a little more now.... Uh oh, time to get to "work"
    Please don't tell me make food in that toaster oven at all.

    When ever you bake epoxy a oven should never be used for food again.
    Last edited by mazur50; 09-20-2011 at 09:37 AM.
    Michael Mazur
    Ruzam Racing
    Team ProSlot

  14. #1289
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Richmond, CA
    Posts
    1,279
    Quote Originally Posted by mazur50 View Post
    Please don't tell me make food in that toaster oven as all.

    When ever you bake epoxy a oven should never be used for food again.
    Yes, we use it for food prep like making toast. Mostly making toast I think. No ill effects...yet. I think Skinner could become the new Marmite, makes a good spread on toast, goes well with eggs.
    Journeyman Industrial Slotcar Worker, Teamsters Local 3299 AFL-CIO
    Now with "Improved Karma"

  15. #1290
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Land of Excitement "Bensenville"
    Posts
    1,326
    I would suggest spending the $20-$30 and get a new one for the kitchen and move that one to your shop.

    Chemicals like epoxy will leave a arsenic fill in a oven. You should never reuse a oven once used for epoxy or something like powerdcoating.

    I really think koford and skinners should put a Waring on there tubes because i have found to many people using there kitchen ovens for this.

    Just ask Monty about the Chinese man and the chicken story.
    Michael Mazur
    Ruzam Racing
    Team ProSlot

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