.

.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4
1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 51

Thread: FCR National Championship Series - Building Cars To Compete In This Series

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Umatilla, Fl
    Posts
    1,241

    FCR National Championship Series - Building Cars To Compete In This Series

    When I first saw the notification for the FCR National Championship Series, I got excited. The more I read, the more excited I became. This is, at least in my opinion, a racer's series. One that is friendly to both the racer and also the raceway owners. It is based on performance - once again, both for the racers and the raceways.

    To begin with, racers stay and compete for points at their local raceways. No travel to contend with. I think this is the proper way in this day and age of $4.00 per gallon gasoline.

    It is friendly to the raceway owners as they do not have to have their racers going to another raceway to compete. Everyone stays at their home track and races, yet still have the ability to compete for a place at the Regional level and possibly the National level.

    Each time you race, you get points awarded based on the number of racers, where you finish the race at and also a couple of bonus points - 1 for fastest qualifier and also 1 for fastest lap during the race. I think we are all seeing the effect of bonus points in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series. You can be part of similar racing excitement in the FCR National Championship Series.

    The Regional race will happen at the raceway that has the most entries during the regular season, which runs this year from November thru April. So, both you and your raceway owner have a reason to get more racers in on race night. If you have 9 or more racers, there are 3 bonus points awarded to each of the racers. And the raceway with the most entries will host the Regional race.

    Where will the National event be held at? The region that gets the most entries during the regular season. Sounds like a great reason to talk to your friends about coming out and racing FCR cars?

    Another thing I really like about it is that there should be something for everyone to get interested in. I checked out the www fcrseries com website and saw that they had the following categories.
    • "Cup" - Presented by Team HRE Division
    • Parma Spec Stock Car Division
    • Supertruck Division
    • Jerry's Speed & Custom Parts - Grand National Division
    • Parma Dirt Late Model Division
    • Parma Challenge Stock Car Division (Novice Only)
    I have recently sat down and studied all the rules. I do believe by swapping tires, motors and bodies, I can compete in 5 of these divisions with a single FCR chassis, 3 motors, 4 bodies and 3 sets of tires.

    That, in my opinion, makes for some very inexpensive slot car racing.

    Also in my opinion, the most heavily contested division is going to be the Parma Spec Stock Car Division. Why do I say that? Simple, everyone's got the same car and it all comes down to skill and a bit of racing luck.

    A couple of weeks ago I was at my local raceway and there were a few of us that had just bought some FCR cars. We were having so much fun just running laps on the road course, banging fenders, doors and other assorted regions on the bodies, it was causing lots of almost uncontrollable laughter. If I can buy a $38.99 car and have that much fun, it sure does sound like a great program.

    I am going to go ahead and build up a chassis using all the things I know about FCR chassis. Once I get the chassis the way I want it, then I am going to perpare a car to run in some of these divisions. I think the first one I will concentrate on is the Parma Spec Stock Car Division.

    Stay tuned!
    Last edited by fl_slotter; 10-04-2011 at 10:48 AM.
    Florida Slotter, aka Marty Stanley,
    A "Double 60's" Slot Racer
    Killer X Raceways Team Racer

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Umatilla, Fl
    Posts
    1,241

    Building a Parma Spec Stock Car Division Entry

    The first car I am going to prepare is the oen to compete in the Parma Spec Stock Car Division.

    Here's what we start with:


    Just a Parma 4.5 inch FCR chassis. $38.99 MSRP. For that you get a brass chassis, Deathstar 501 motor, 2 1/8 inch axles, spacers, guide, wires, braid, wheels and tires, gears and some Velcro strips. If you were to price out the cost of buying all the parts individually, it would cost over $65.00, so the RTR without a body is an excellent deal.

    Here are the rules for the Parma Spec Stock Car Division:

    PARMA SPEC STOCK CAR DIVISION

    1. CHASSIS:
    • MUST USE PARMA FCR 4.5 IN WB CHASSIS.
    • MAY NOT BE ALTERED IN ANY WAY OTHER THAN WHAT IS SPECIFIED IN RULES. MUST HAVE .062” CLEARANCE IN REAR TO GEAR.
    • MUST HAVE .032" CLEARANCE IN FRONT OF CHASSIS, MEASURED WHERE CHASSIS WIDENS BEHIND FRONT AXLE, SITTING ON TIRES ON TECH BLOCK. (GUIDE NOT TOUCHING) GAUGE MUST SLIDE UNDER WITHOUT LIFTING TIRES FROM TECH BLOCK.
    • ANY GUIDE FLAG MAY BE USED.
    • NO BRACING MAY BE ADDED
    2. MOTOR:
    • MUST USE SEALED PARMA #501 DEATHSTAR
    • ANY BRUSH MAY BE USED. NO SHUNTED
    • MUST USE STOCK PARMA 16D SPRINGS
    • ANY LEAD WIRE MAY BE USED. CLIPS PERMITTED
    3. AXLE:
    • MUST USE 1/8 AXLE.
    • STOCK OILITES ONLY, NO BEARINGS
    • 3 1/4 INCH MAX WIDTH FRONT & REAR. EQUALLY SPACED ON BOTH SIDES. FRONT TIRES MUST BE LOCKED TO AXLE,
    • AXLE MUST ROTATE. NO FREEWHEELING
    • CAR MUST FALL FROM TECH GAUGE WITH IT'S OWN WEIGHT.
    4. GEARS:
    • MUST USE 9:30 GEAR RATIO STOCK PARMA
    • 9T PRESS ON PINION MUST BE USED
    5. TIRES:
    • MUST USE SPEC FCR SERIES PARMA TIRE (AVAILABLE SOON)
    • MUST USE PARMA #699K FRONT TIRES
    • MIN DIAM: REAR: .840 FRONT: .810
    • MIN WIDTH: FRONT: .400
    • MAX WIDTH: REAR: .810
    6. BODY:
    • APPROVED BODY LIST FOR PARMA SPEC STOCK CAR: ALL BODY PART NUMBERS MUST BE "B" OR "C" THICKNESS ONLY:
    • P - 1055 MIN ROOF HEIGHT: 1 7/8 .
    • MAY NOT BE "BUBBLED" TO PASS TECH.
    • FRONT BUMPER TO BE CUT ON THE CUT LINE.
    • 1/8" MIN REAR BUMPER HEIGHT.
    • REAR SPOILER MAY NOT BE HIGHER THAN 1 3/4
    • NO ADDED SPOILERS
    • MUST HAVE VISIBLE NUMBERS ON BOTH DOORS
    • MUST HAVE FULL 3-D INTERIOR SUCH AS PARMA #807 OR CHAMPION #361-C
    • NO DROOPING OF INTERIOR.
    The way I am reading this is if you take the Parma RTR FCR, add a Parma COT (#1055B or #1055C) body to it, a plastic interior, your choice of guide flag and wires and get a set of the "FCR" series tires, you are good to go. No bracing, nothing else allowed. So the first thing to do is disassemble the entire car, and start by making sure the chassis is flat, the axle parallel and the same distance off of the track's surface.

    So that is the next installment.
    Last edited by fl_slotter; 10-04-2011 at 10:48 AM.
    Florida Slotter, aka Marty Stanley,
    A "Double 60's" Slot Racer
    Killer X Raceways Team Racer

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Umatilla, Fl
    Posts
    1,241

    Building a Parma Spec Stock Car Division Entry - Part #2

    Sorry about the delay, but I just had to do some tidying up of my workspace. I just could not work where I was spending almost as much time looking for something as I was using it. So I took a couple of hours, put everything back in the place that it has, cleasned up the work area and just got myself organized. It's much nicer now.

    Well the first thing we need to do is strip the chassis down to a bare chassis. The rear bushings are soldered in place, so we will just leave them in place. So I got out the good old Parma double ended allen wrench and took off everything that would come off. This is what was left.


    This is sort of like looking at a chicken without it feathers. It's the same, just sorta looks like a whole lot less. Now you have this piece of stamped brass, you will have to make it nice and flat and straight. As with any piece of metal that is stamped on a big press, it is not always straight and flat. That is our job. The more time you take making it flat and straight, the better it will work later on. So let's get started.


    One of the most useful tools I have in my collection is the Champion "Tech Tool". Not only can you meassure track and clearance, but it also has correct tire width, a square and a super straight edge. If you don't have one, I strongly urge you to get one and start using it. You will be impressed at just how much you wind up using it to do all the work for you.

    That long piece of metal is also a great thing to have. I can check right front to left rear and left front to right rear to make sure the chassis is flat. Take your time, put a bit of pressure here and there to get it flat. It might seem like it takes forever, but the first lap you make with the FCR car you will be happy that you took the time.

    I like to use a jig to build my chassis. Whether it is a scratchbuilt chassis for retro racing, a flexi for lots of racing or an FCR chassis, I like using a jig. Now it can get expensive owning a 'purpose built jig', but I was fortunate to find this jig as it works very well for all the chassis I build. It is made by R-Geo Products and it is called "The Super Jig". Like any great tool, it is flexible enough to be used for just about any situation by making little 'adaptors' for a particular task. When I use 3/32 axles, I simply slip a short piece of 1/8 inch aluminum tubing over the build axle and it fits the 1/8 inch spacing. With all the holes for wheelbase, it will fit just about any wheelbase. I have built 1/32 cars, 1/43 scratchbuilt cars, 1/24, Womps, Flexs of all flavors and of now FCR chassis. Those spiffy looking red anodized jig wheels came from the same source.

    Please do not think if you don't own a jig and a set of jig wheels that there is no hope for you. Many years ago - we're talking the 1960's here - I did not own a jig. That did not stop me from building. I got a pair of Popsicle sticks, laid them face to face and drilled an 1/8 inch hole in one end and then another 1/8 inch hole 4.5 inches away. I woud slip them over the axle and that would square the axles to one another. If you use 30 tooth crown gears (you get one with each FCR you buy), they are just about the correct height to hold the chassis slightly off the surface of the jig or a flat surface so you can get all 4 corners exactly the same height. Be inventive, that's what it is all about.


    Personally I like round jig wheels much better then flat ones. My main reason is that I can try to spin the round jig wheels and feel the amount of friction between each one and the surface of the jig. My opinion is that give me the ability to make sure everything is flat and true. Just my opinion of course.

    When you get that done, it's time to check the uprights to make sure they are perpendicular to the bottom of the chassis. Once again, it's a great job for that 'old faithful' tech tool.


    Why solder the bushing in place if the upright is not upright? Then you will have to go back and resolder the bushing to make the axle spin nice and free. Now that we have the axle uprights all nice and squared up, it's time to do some soldering.

    But before soldering them in place, let's talk about the position of the Parma Adjust-a-Bushings. As per the rules, if you use a 4.5 inch chassis, then you can put the Adjust-a-Bushings in any position as long as it makes you smile. I have chosen the "Top - Rear" position for the chassis I am building. That gives me a 4.5 inch wheelbase and make the 'Guide Lead' (distance from centerline of front axle to centerline of the guide flag post) the longest.



    I can not stress enough that if you want a nice clean solder joint, you MUST start with nice asnd clean areas that you want to solder. Take a ScotchBrite pad and make the brass shine prior to soldering. Add a little bit of flux - I like Lucky Bob's liquid flux - and do not be afraid to put some heat into the joint! I clean the tip of my iron, then apply just a little bit of solder to help the heat transfer to the piece you want to solder. Let the iron heat up the work and the work melt the solder. You will see the solder flow into the joint. I would take a photo of this process, but I need one hand to hold the iron, one hand to hold the solder and all of a sudden, I'm out of hands! But I can show you what it should look like when you are finished.


    Some of you might have noticed that the 'axle' I use for soldering is kinda different. It is a piece of 1/8 inch aluminum tubing over a piece of 3/32 piano wire. I learned a long time ago that using a steel axle for soldering is not the best trick in the book. It takes longer to heat the area up and solder can actually flow down and make the axle a part of the joint. Please, do not ask me how I know this!

    Now it's time to clean the flux off of the bushings as it will cause corrosion if you leave it there. The best way to clean it is to use a bit of scouring powder and a toothbrush - preferrably one that is no longer used for it's prime purpose - to give the area a good cleaning. Then a wash with some dish soap and a ScotchBrite pad will keep things nice and shiny.

    I hope to get the parts back on tomorrow and have the chassis ready to go in part #3.

    Stay tuned!
    Last edited by fl_slotter; 10-04-2011 at 10:50 AM.
    Florida Slotter, aka Marty Stanley,
    A "Double 60's" Slot Racer
    Killer X Raceways Team Racer

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Umatilla, Fl
    Posts
    1,241

    Building a Parma Spec Stock Car Division Entry - Part #3

    Now it's time to put it all back together and get ready to take it to the track for some pratice and checking out of the work.

    The specs for the front tires in this category are .400 wide by .810 in diameter. So I put the front tires on my Hudy and cut them to .410 wide by .815 diameter. So the fronts are narrowed and trued and basically to minimum size according to the specs.

    On the rear tires, I ran them on the Hudy just to make sure they are round. The minimum diameter is .840, so I made sure they slightly exceeded the minimum. Some of those tech guys are pretty clever about making sure the tires are spot on. I'm hoping to pick up a pair of the FCR Spec tire that is required for this division on my next trip to the raceway.

    Before putting the axles back in place I chucked them one at a time into my Dremel, then took some 1500 grit wet or dry sandpaper, put some oil on the paper and polished the axles. Of course, I used my 1/8 inch hone to make sure the oilites were nice and smooth bore. With a drop of the blue oil that Epic produces the front and rear axles both turn nice and free.

    I added some clips to the original Parma wires as I really do not like having the wires making contact with the braids. I think clips are a necessity. Then I set the guide depth for the track I intend to test on and basically the chassis is ready to go an test.



    As I had stated in the opening post of this build, the Parma Spec Stock Car division has a single choice for the body you run. The Parma 1055B or 1055C is the only choice you have. Overall I think it is great to have a spec class to compete in. Prep is very important as well as setup and driving skills. That is what is going to make this class so much fun. Most races are going to be decided late in the race with many in the final segment and possibly on the final lap. I foresee races being decided by feet rather then laps. Those are the kind of races where your hands are shaking so badly after the race that you know you had a lot of fun!

    So I prepared a Parma 1055C body for my entry. In my opinion, Mark Martin is the best driver in NASCAR that has never won a championship. Besides I liked the look of the #6 Ford he drove for many years and had the decals sitting around to paint one up. All the decals are on the inside of the body. I learned about Mod Podge from a friend that also likes nice looking slot car bodies. You simply put a very small amount of Mod Podge on the inside of the body where you want the decal to set. Once it has dried overnight, you can paint right over it and it looks great.


    So my Parma Spec Stock Car entry is almost preparted. I need to paint up an interior and I'll be ready.

    Next up is a braced chassis for use in CUP, Supertrucks, Grand National and Dirt Late Model divisions.

    I see competing in all divisions with 2 chassis (one braced and one non-braced), 3 different motors (a 501, a 502 and a "Built" motor with a spec arm in it), 3 sets of tires and 4 different bodies.

    Once again, stay tuned as more will follow shortly.
    Florida Slotter, aka Marty Stanley,
    A "Double 60's" Slot Racer
    Killer X Raceways Team Racer

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Elizabethton, TN
    Posts
    115
    Great post and great looking car! There's gonna be some good racers coming out of that Sunshine Region!
    www.easttennmodelraceway.com
    HRE - Custom built Retro chassis - Custom built race motors
    Third Eye Technology - The image of the sport!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    76
    AWESOME car you have there Marty. We are going to have a lot of fun racing these in the Parma FCR series!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Umatilla, Fl
    Posts
    1,241

    Part 4 - Building a "Braced Chassis" to Compete in the FCR National Championship Series

    I truly do not understand how I was able to accomplish anything prior to retiring. Right now I can't find all the time I would like to spend working on my slot cars. I feel sorry for all of you that still have to work.

    We had an "Enduro" race on the 15th, so I had a car to build for that. We had a blast. Then the next day we raced FCR cars on a track that has left Central Florida for someplace in North Carolina. I'll say this about that track . . . . . if you have a chance to race on it, do not pass it up. We were racing 4 inch FCR Trucks and the fast truck was running in the 1.85 second per lap range and the slow truck was in the 1.92 second lap time. That's not a whole lot of difference! About .07 seconds. Depending on which lane you were on, you were able to get ahead in the turns or not. The passing was really interesting and you had to work hard at it. A great track to be enjoyed by all.

    This past Sunday I was able to get a chance to run down to Longwood, Florida and visit ASR-IMS. The King that they have there was up in Mineral Ridge, Ohio and is one of, if not the best King I've run on. The power is plentiful, clean and the track is just fast. No, it is NOT a 'punch bowl' type of setup, as the 90 degree turn, donut and lead on are virtually flat. You have to drive half the track and it makes for some great racing action.

    The FCR Spec tires were in stock and I purchased a pair. I put them on my car and they are markedly better then the stock FCR tires. After 'running the stickers off' the new tires I started to see what the Parma Spec car I built in Part #1 would do. In a few laps I was able to run withing a couple of tenths of the track record. So without a doubt, the car is competitive.

    After getting some cars prepared for this coming weekend and retro racing, I finally got a chance to start building my "braced chassis" to run in 4 of the Divisions of the FCR National Championship Series.

    First of all, I ordered bits and pieces from:

    Team HRE - front axle, bracing kit
    JK Products - Cheetah 11 nose brace
    Pro-Track - 219 fronts and 252 rears
    Ralph Thorne Racing - some natural rubber donuts that are BIG.

    Here is a photo of all the stuff needed to build a good braced FCR chassis.


    The front axle from Team HRE is a thing of beauty. It has set screws on both ends. You can make both sides of the front axle independant without the use of a soldering iron. The workmanship is outstanding and I think with a magnifier, one could shave in the reflection provided by the polishing on the axle itself.

    After receiving the bracing kit, I called Team HRE and asked about where they suggest all the parts should go. I was told that most of the parts are not even used. They recommended just using the motor bracket bracing as that is the way the FCR cars handle best. Hey, when in doubt, talk to the tech dudes at the companies you buy your parts from. Lots of time and frustration can be saved by doing that.

    I love the look of the Pro-Track 219 fronts and 252 rears. The tires work well and you can run them in just about all the classes. They are required in the Grand National class, so I thought I'd put them on my braced chassis and give them a try.

    From racing on the oval at Slot Car Drags, I have a set of worn out Pro-Track 252 tires. Since you can run "any black natural rubber" in the Cup, Supertruck and Dirt Late Model Divisions, I ordered some of the nicest and very soft donuts from Ralph Thorne Racing. I mounted a set of the donuts up and tested them on Sunday. They work incredibly well and I know what I'll be using for those categories from now on.

    So, how extensive is my bracing going to be? Well after I got the chassis plate all straight, flat and square, I chose to add a tongue stiffener by JK to the front and a set of "L" braces to the motor bracket and rear of the chassis.

    First things first.


    With the chassis flat on the jig, I decided to add some angle to the guide tongue prior to making it stiffer. I find that if the nose of the tongue is higher then the rear, the car just works so much better. While this might look like an excessive amount, I can assure you that some of that will disappear when the rear of the chassis is set at .063 inch clearance.

    I chose to set the ride height on this chassis. My jig wheels are .750 in diameter. I filed the top of the Adjust-a-Bushing opening to let me set the front of the chassis flat on the jig. When I put some .8125 tires on the front, the clearance will be .032. In the rear I used the same .750 jig wheels and set the chassis flat on the surface. When I have .842 tires on the rear, then I'll have the necessary clearance. Jig wheels make it so nice to set the chassis up correctly every time. I got my jig wheels from R-Geo Products. They are "Jaildoor" jig wheels. For the FCR car, if you use 2 pairs of the front jig wheels, you will be right on every time. R-Geo Products is a vendor here on OWH and just check them out in that portion of the forum.


    Now it was time to make sure the motor bracket was square with the bottom of the frame. I still use my Champion Tech Tool for lots of things during my builds.

    I solderd a pair of .078 wire "L" pieces that run from the motor bracket to the rear of the chassis. This keeps the motor bracket / gear alignment and also stiffens the rear of the chassis.


    Here's the chassis after a trip to the kitchen sink - did I mention my wife works??? A bit of cleanser like Comet, an old toothbrush, then a bit of work with a ScotchBrite and some dish soap and the flux is all gone. If you skip this step, you will have a nasty looking chassis in a very short period of time.

    Next up is we're goina to complete the chassis with wheels, tires, guide flag, wires, motor and a body.

    I have an idea for a killer looking Dirt Late Model, so I'm going out in the garage to put some paint on lexan. See y'all soon.


    Last edited by fl_slotter; 10-25-2011 at 02:17 PM.
    Florida Slotter, aka Marty Stanley,
    A "Double 60's" Slot Racer
    Killer X Raceways Team Racer

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Umatilla, Fl
    Posts
    1,241

    Part 5 - We Now Have a 'Braced Chassis" . . . . What Now?

    Well now that we have a braced FCR chassis built, what can we do with this? From what I read in the rules, there are 4 distinct divisions that this configuration acan be used in.

    For this part, let's build a Dirt Late Modified Division entry. To begin with, let's take a look at the rules and then we'll decide.

    PARMA DIRT LATE MODEL DIVISION

    1. MUST USE PARMA FCR 4.5 IN WB CHASSIS. MAY NOT BE ALTERED IN ANY WAY OTHER THAN WHAT IS SPECIFIED IN RULES.
    • MUST HAVE .062 CLEARANCE IN REAR TO GEAR.
    • MUST HAVE .032" CLEARANCE IN FRONT OF CHASSIS, MEASURED WHERE CHASSIS WIDENS BEHIND FRONT AXLE, SITTING ON TIRES ON TECH BLOCK. (GUIDE NOT TOUCHING) GAUGE MUST SLIDE UNDER WITHOUT LIFTING TIRES FROM TECH BLOCK.
    • ANY GUIDE FLAG MAY BE USED.
    • BRACING MAY BE ADDED, HOWEVER, NO BRACING CAN PROTRUDE OUTSIDE THE FACTORY DIMENSIONS OF CHASSIS
    2. MOTOR:
    • MUST USE SEALED PARMA #502 SUPER 16D
    • ANY LEAD WIRE MAY BE USED. CLIPS PERMITTED
    • ANY SPRING MAY BE USED.
    • ANY BRUSH MAY BE USED. NO SHUNTED.
    3. AXLE:
    • MUST USE 1/8 AXLE. STOCK OILITES ONLY, NO BEARINGS
    • 3 1/4 INCH MAX WIDTH FRONT & REAR. EQUALLY SPACED ON BOTH SIDES.
    • FREEWHEELING FRONT AXLE PERMITTED.
    • CAR MUST FALL FROM TECH GAUGE WITH IT'S OWN WEIGHT.
    4. GEARS:
    • ANY GEAR RATIO PERMITTED. 48 PITCH ONLY.
    • ANGLED PINION MAY BE USED.
    5. TIRES:
    • ANY BLACK RUBBER TIRE. (NO SPEED RUBBER)
    • MIN DIAM: REAR: .840 FRONT: .810
    • MIN WIDTH: FRONT: .400
    • MAX WIDTH: REAR: .810
    6. BODY:
    • APPROVED BODY LIST FOR PARMA DIRT LATE MODEL
    • ALL BODY PART NUMBERS BELOW ARE TO BE "B" OR "C" THICKNESS ONLY
    • P - 1000 P - 1017
    • 1/4" MIN FRONT BUMPER HEIGHT.
    • REAR OF BODY MAY BE OPENED, MUST HAVE 1/4 "BORDER" AROUND REAR OF CAR
    • REAR SPOILER MAY NOT BE HIGHER THAN 1 3/4
    • NO ADDED SPOILERS
    • MUST HAVE VISIBLE NUMBERS ON BOTH DOORS
    • MUST HAVE FULL 3-D INTERIOR SUCH AS PARMA #807 OR CHAMPION #361-C.
    • NO DROOPING OF INTERIOR.

    • IF IT DOESN'T SAY YOU CAN DO IT, YOU CAN'T!

    Now this division sounds like so much fun. Kind of like souped up turtles galloping around a track. I'm sure this is going to be one of those categories where you either love it or can't ake it. Myself, I'm in as I love S16D motors in slot cvars.

    As I mentioned in my previous post, I had an idea for a paint scheme on my Parma 1000B body. Here is what happened:



    Okay, so now I have a body and a chassis ready to put some parts and pieces in. I think it's time to build a Parma 502 motor up. Then we will continue this article.

    When I build a Parma 'Sealed' motor, I do not open the seal. I stay outside of the motor and just do things that you can access from the outside. One of the things I have found that seems to wake this motor up is to remove the springs and brushes. Now give the arm a 'spin'. Watch where the arm locates itself in the can. You can slide the magnets a bit to get the arm so it 'centers' itself in the field. If you can get it so the arm is almost sitting against the endbell bushing, we can move the can bushing in and solder it in place to minimize the movement of the arm. Now put a set of springs and good brushes in the motor, some oil on the bushings and set it on the power supply at 4.0 volts for about 15 minutes. You should now have a very competitive Parma 502.

    Watch for the next posting.

    Florida Slotter, aka Marty Stanley,
    A "Double 60's" Slot Racer
    Killer X Raceways Team Racer

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4
    Good job - nice looking body.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Umatilla, Fl
    Posts
    1,241
    dalek,

    I see your location is "Central Florida". What a great spot to be at. The FCR National Championship Series will be taking place in Longwood - at ASR-IMS, in Melbourne - at TheRaceway.biz and also in Holly Hill - at The Race Place.

    On November 3rd, in Holly Hill, we will be racing Parma Spec and also SuperTrucks.

    On November 5th, in Longwood, we will be having a "FCR Fun Day" where we will race any and all of the FCR National Championship Series divisions, if we have enough entries. I do believe it is going to be a $10 for all day type of affair.

    On November 12th, in Melbourne, Dirt Late Model racing will be held at TheRaceway.biz, then on the 22nd, Parma Spec and Grand National will take place.

    November 13th, back in Longwood, ASR-IMS will host their kick off FCR-NCS racing with Parma Spec and Cup.

    Lots of FCR stuff going on, sure hope you can make it join in on the fun.
    Florida Slotter, aka Marty Stanley,
    A "Double 60's" Slot Racer
    Killer X Raceways Team Racer

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Umatilla, Fl
    Posts
    1,241

    Part 6 - Finishing the Dirt Late Model

    Okay, I'm ready to finish up the Dirt Late Model.

    Since we can run any black non-speed rubber tire on the back of the Dirt Late Model, I figured I would mount up some 'donuts' - 1 set of soft, 1 set of medium and 1 set of firm tires. I have a couple of sets of Pro-Track rims sitting around and decided I'd like to mount up my tires on them since I am using a set of Pro-Track 219s on the front. Hey, those tires work really well on an FCR car so until I find something better, I'll use them for all the classes I can.

    Before I start to mount the donuts on the rims, let me give you a link to a fantastic article:

    First Time Making Tires on My Own - by TrailerKeith

    There is so much information in that thread that you really should read it.

    Another excellent thread here on OWH that I should have provided a link to earlier is:

    Airbrush Painting 101 - by Craig "flyracing" Rieland

    Now that you have some excellent resources to refer to when mounting donuts or painting those bodies, it's time to get back to work.


    (Yes, I know it's not a Pro-Track rim, but it is the same size. I mounted the donuts earlier)

    The first thing you will notice is the hole in the donut is much smaller then the Pro-Track rim. HOWEVER I found something that makes the job much easier. Yep, another one of those great items available from R-Geo Products. This tool makes the job almost effortless.


    This is the "Tire Tower" from R-Geo Products. It uses a cone cut from teflon (I make little coneheads when not mounting tires!) and a flat disk. I put an old bushing between the disk and the rim. This just about perfectly spacing the rim so the donut just slips on and slides right into place. I took an old 3/32 axle and soldered a piece of 1/8 inch brass tubing on to one end. I then stick the brass tubing into my Super Jig and it makes a nice little tire mounting work station.

    After you apply glue to both the outside of the wheel and the inside of the donut you let them sit and dry for about 20 to 30 minutes. Just prior to sliding the donut on to the rim, I dip them into a small jar with lacquer thinner. This not only makes the job earier, but it seems to make the glue set up better and the tire comes out very nice every time.

    Once the donut is mounted, I let the assembly sit overnight before putting them on my Hudy to cut the width and diameter that I am looking for.

    Here is what the finished product will look like:


    I took my Pro-Track 219 tires and cut them to .815 diameter. I also cut some spacers at .300 for each side out of some 5/32 round brass tubing. I put the Team HRE front axle in place, my home made spacers and the spacers supplied with the front axle under the set screws for the ends of the axles. I now have a free wheeling front axle where both front tires can rotate independantly of the axle and the axle can still spin. I like this product a whole bunch.

    My rear tires were cut to .850 (I want to do some practice before the race) and then I chucked my rear axle in my Dremel and grabbed a piece of 1500 grit paper, oiled it up and polished the rear axle. When it looked like glass, I installed it in the rear bushings, put my spacers on, a 28 tooth Parma King Crown gear, the other wheel, tightened it all down once I could spin the rear tires and there was almost no resistance.

    The motor that we 'prepped' in the previous step was screwed into place, I added a guide flag, set the guide flag depth for the track I'll be racing on, added some wires, clips and such and the chassis was ready to go.

    Here's a couple of photos:



    For those that are interested, I mounted a 7 tooth ARP angled pinion on my Parma 502. The track we will be racing on is a short track - 56 feet per lap.


    I'm quite sure the Dirt Late Models will be a very exciting division on this track. It might also cause a bit of body damage, so I thought I might want to carry a spare along with me, so I fired up the airbrush and painted one up. I still have to cut the wheel wells and put in an interior, but the painting is now complete.


    I'm not sure what to build next, but it's probably going to be a body change, a motor change or a set of tires to change. The cool part of this entire FCR National Championship Series is that you can race the entire series with 1 chassis (unbraced), 4 bodies (COT can be used in Cup, Parma Spec and Parma Challenge), 3 motors and a couple of different tires.


    Florida Slotter, aka Marty Stanley,
    A "Double 60's" Slot Racer
    Killer X Raceways Team Racer

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    130
    Do you have to use the velcro to attach the body to the car? Can you use clips?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Umatilla, Fl
    Posts
    1,241
    Quote Originally Posted by Bartx7000 View Post
    Do you have to use the velcro to attach the body to the car? Can you use clips?
    Over on the FCR National Championship Series website - www.fcrseries.com - there is a paragraph that covers a lot of 'incidental' rules that pertain to all the divisions. Here is that paragraph:

    A FEW SMALL THINGS THAT APPLY TO ALL DIVISIONS:

    YOU CAN ADD, LEAD WIRE CLIPS, USE ANY MOTOR BRUSH, ADD LEAD WEIGHT TO CHASSIS (NOT ON THE UNDERSIDE), ATTACH BODY TO CHASSIS USING VELCRO OR BODY CLIPS, NO STRAIGHT PINS, AND BODY MUST SIT ON CHASSIS, NOT HANG BELOW ON THE SIDES.
    Florida Slotter, aka Marty Stanley,
    A "Double 60's" Slot Racer
    Killer X Raceways Team Racer

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    141
    awesome thread! i want to ask you ,the front bushing is set back ,does it handle better in that position,everyone at my track swears by the forward position,and we set our front wheel width to about 3 inches.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Umatilla, Fl
    Posts
    1,241
    Fester,

    To begin with, thank you for the comments.

    On the bushings - it's just a personal thing. I'm sure if you ask about 25 different people, you will get about 75 to 100 different opinions. Kind of like if you take any race car set up for any driver in 1:1 racing, if you put another driver behind the wheel, they simply do not like the feel of the car. For my tastes, I like the little bit extra guide lead. I find it suits my driving style more better. However there are about 4 ways to set up the spacing, so by all means try it to see what works best for you.

    BTW - the Parma Spec setup set the fast lap time during a race this past Thursday evening. I'm thinking the setup works pretty good.
    Florida Slotter, aka Marty Stanley,
    A "Double 60's" Slot Racer
    Killer X Raceways Team Racer

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4
1 2 3 4 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts