.

.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 30 of 30

Thread: Philosophy of chassis building!

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    San Diego at the beach of course, love babes
    Posts
    2,303
    Well its painted in a hideous color but I know I will find it, the question ist which on will run better that day?







    Are you guys building?




    Nesta
    I'm the most boring person you could meet.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    San Diego at the beach of course, love babes
    Posts
    2,303
    Well the F1 came into 89grams and next question is what do you prefer in chassis length?
    Short or long wheel base and what is your favorite guide lead and why!
    I know the story about long cars are more forgiving and that short rides are quicker around the bend.




    Nesta
    I'm the most boring person you could meet.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    San Diego at the beach of course, love babes
    Posts
    2,303
    I guess some of you don't have clue?
    Well it was worth a try!



    Nesta
    I'm the most boring person you could meet.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    NorthWesterner now in Philippines
    Posts
    9,648
    I found years ago that my clues rarely meant much once I got my cars on the track.

    The lap timer, and ultimately the lap counter, are the only real indicators of what works.

    There are just so many variables, that it makes it extremely difficult to predict - even with the aid of all sorts of fancy gauges and meters.

    I understand that many feel that you can at least increase your odds by measuring and testing... or even duplicate cars/motors/chassis that have had good results... but there are so many factors that it still leaves so much to chance.

    It does put you at a big disadvantage when you have to do your building many miles from the track, as it makes testing & tuning sessions difficult or impossible. The only way is to either arrive early on race day for your testing & tuning - or build 2 or more cars with different setups, and then see which one works the best when you get to the track.

    The only way to really tell which variations work better or worse, is to either try one way, check the lap times, make 1 change, and try again. Trial and error.

    The next best is to build 2 identical cars with different setups, and see what works best.

    You are probably not getting much discussion on the philosophical theories on chassis building, because... well... as you said... many people really do not have a clue!

    Clues often require a crystal ball. Results only require the lap counter!

    I really miss building... but at this time it would be extremely difficult to build. I am not only without tools, but access to parts, supplies, and a track, make it nearly impossible from here in the Philippines. I hope to get my 1/32 or HO tracks here sometime... but until then, I really do enjoy weeing all the pictures and following the discussions and results here online!

    Please don't give up hope - just because nobody posts a reply right away! Many people read, but do not post... and some may just be too busy building or racing!

    PK @ OWH
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Paul Kassens
    OWH Slot Car Talk "Mom"
    The Old Weird Herald
    email: paulk@oldweirdherald.com

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Long Island,N.Y.
    Posts
    984
    I'm working on a computer program that can simulate any racetrack,conditions,voltage,body,and motor choice. It then spits out a design that will work perfect.Eliminates all that pesky testing.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    San Diego at the beach of course, love babes
    Posts
    2,303
    Mom, I never give up. Sam please keep us updated with your findings.




    Nesta
    I'm the most boring person you could meet.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    263
    Basically what Paul said is soo true!! No matter what you think of in your head--until you get it on the track and start testing--you just don't know!! You can build 5 cars--as IDENTICAL as possible--and ONE of them will be better than all the rest!! That's certainly part of the problem. But-- trying stuff and building is it's OWN reward!! Guys like Warmack--who I've followed closely because he will SHARE anything he finds--has built multiple cars as described above--and found the same thing!! Tiny variations in piano wire and brass quality make tiny variations in your design. Just keep building--the "wishbone" idea is my most recent obsession!! They seem to work really well and are EZ to drive!! That alone keeps me coming back!! Enjoy!

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    263
    Here's the Generation II and Generation III "wishbone car that I've been working on. The "plumber" style worked okay--but was too heavy! Then I went to the "shaker" type pans--no improvement!! So I went to lighter pans--and hinged them in the more conventional style which got the car down to 116 grams! That should be a good weight for the flat track!! Now--we'll see!!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Gen III..jpg 
Views:	73 
Size:	61.3 KB 
ID:	12809  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	wishbone..jpg 
Views:	76 
Size:	63.5 KB 
ID:	12810  


  9. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    San Diego at the beach of course, love babes
    Posts
    2,303
    Great looking chassis you build Tim, question what do you think is the right weight on a flat track?
    Have to say that the rides that is run on the flat track is looking way to heavy, is it because it always have been done that way?


    Nesta
    I'm the most boring person you could meet.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    San Diego at the beach of course, love babes
    Posts
    2,303
    What is the lightest chassis that won on the flat track at BPR? Maybe I should talk to Duran!
    Ask me what do I think is the right weight?
    If it cant change we will still playing eight track gear in our cars?




    Nesta
    I'm the most boring person you could meet.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    263
    Well Warmack has won MANY times with cars that weighed as much as 130- 135 grams!! I've got my first wishbone car--that I just ran on the flat track last week and it was VERY good --at 104 grams. This new wishbone is 116--still relatively light. Duran has been running JK Can Am's on the flat track--around 120 grams or more. I haven't seen him lately---but getting under 115 grams is VERY unusual up to this point. That's why I'm experimenting with the wishbones--as they seem to work well at lighter weights!! So--we'll see!!

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    San Diego at the beach of course, love babes
    Posts
    2,303
    I will join the flat track racers in the future because I would like to run chassis that are 100 to 105g.
    So I'm with ya Tim.




    Nesta
    I'm the most boring person you could meet.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Tampa
    Posts
    484
    (Guess who’s back? And I actually started building a chassis today! Man, did I ever miss this sh…!)

    Philosophy… I think there are probably as many “scratchbuilding philosophies” as there are philosophies on life in general, which in my opinion are usually at best wishful thinking. I tend to view a person who thinks they have all the answers as a person who just got tired of the questions and took the easy route by ignoring them… But I digress…

    I don’t know that there are ever any magic generalizations that will work all the time (oh yeah, I’m talking about scratchbuilding, though wider application seems to be a possibility here…), so I try to avoid them myself. If however they provide a “basic” idea as a starting point for some, I see no harm in that either. Whatever floats your boat…

    Personally, I have little interest in copying other people’s designs (whoa, there’s a news flash), but I see nothing wrong in doing it either. I prefer to start at some design point and work my way through a series of progressive builds with adaptations; this allows me to have a baseline for comparison purposes. (Oh yeah, try not to make more than one “change” to a successive build whenever possible, because every time I don’t follow this mantra sure enough I always have to backtrack to figure out what did what… But I’m an idiot…) I take this approach largely because of the only underlying “philosophy” that I really apply to all this wire bending and finger burning…

    I’m having fun.

    That’s it, the sum total of my “philosophy”. Have fun.

    But I ain’t no phancy philosopher either…

    Rick

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    263
    "BY GEORGE" ----- " I think you've GOT IT"!!!!

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    San Diego at the beach of course, love babes
    Posts
    2,303
    Rick first of all thanks for your insights, personally I start out with what type of ride I will build.
    I might like a design but I will change size of piano wires to my liking as well the axle to axle length and same goes for lead guide.
    That's how I learn what is going on with a finished chassis that I build. I don't buy chassis and I don't copy it 100%, my time is worth more to me, then what it would cost me to have someone building a roller.
    I build rides to find out what is going on with the choices I made.
    "BY GEORGE" ----- " I think you've GOT IT"!!!! I don't get it but I think I will get closer to what I need.



    Nesta
    I'm the most boring person you could meet.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •