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Thread: Why not anglewinders

  1. #1
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    Why not anglewinders

    Why is retro racing essentially all inlines?
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

  2. #2
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    because they're harder to make them work!
    Russ Toy
    I am team burrito and I approve this message.

  3. #3
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    Though that may be correct, I think the real reason is that the period these organizers wanted to emulate was the period from 64-66 with the jaildoor cars and 67-68 (pre-sindwinder) with the coupes/canam cars. These guys were all fantastic builders during the period and though they may have raced into periods later than 1968, they wanted to go back to the point where they could start building again.

  4. #4
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    I've asked myself the same question, but nice that someone asked here. Possibly because there is the potential for anglewinders to compete and thus dilute flexi racing. The main differences are bigger tires, wire and brassconstruction as well as different (Retro) bodies. I enjoy building anglewinders, but its a specialty that is reserved (at Buena Park) for special Friday events twice a year. However when offered the option of either building inline vs anglewinder, the anglewinder always wins out. The Coupes and Retro 1/32 are two prime examples. If anglewinders were allowed in CanAm, then inlines would soon become a thing of the past. F-1's will always be inline. Since many racers run both CanAm and F-1's, staying with inlines continue to work out well.

  5. #5
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    IMO, here on the East Coast, anglewinders were never really part of the equation. There is a class in IRRA called Retro Pro that was created more like the West Coast Coupe class and not as the WC RP class that is what really caught on. To the best of my knowledge, IRRA Ohio may be the only retro organization that tried it. I may be wrong but I don't think any other IRRA organization has ever conducted an anglewinder class.

    These guys are perfectly content with sticking to inline racing and its all good...

  6. #6
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    D3 originally addressed this with our Coupe and Nascar class's. Our D3 coupes were angle winders--and we still run them on the flat track in our larger races!! The Nascars were originally designated as "Sidewinders" and then later switched to anglewinders when it was difficult to fit full width rubber under the sidewinders!! Then of course--we have "Retro Pro" which is also an anglewinder!! We also run 1/32 cars that are anglewinders. It seems the IRRA did not keep up with all these developments.
    FYI
    Tim

  7. #7
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    I don't think it was ever a question of "keeping up". There has been plenty of opportunity to add anglewinders if IRRA wanted. IRRA is very content and successful with its formula. And if attendance means anything, they should be; its a proven entity.

  8. #8
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    IT wasn't intended as a "shot" at the IRRA---just the facts mam!!! We're still running anglewinders in the Coupe, 1/32, and retro pro class's in the SCRRA. And attendance has been good for both organizations.
    FYI
    T

  9. #9
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    Tim, if you remember your D3 history, BOTH the Coupes and Retro 1/32's were given the choice to build either anglewinder or inline. The 1/32 inlines were restricted to 2.25" width, but the anglewinders could be 2.5". Builders naturally gravitated to anglewinders. The coupes were running together both inline and anglewinders. As it turned out, the anglewinders were winning the races. The rest is history. -m

  10. #10
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    So anglewinders were never big in the east. I did not know that. I grew up in California scratchbuilding. Once we were on to anglewinders I never thought we'd go back to inlines. Maybe thats why I still don't.

    I hope Russ is correct: retro racers are just not speed crazed. They want the challenge of building and racing something that has to be driven. The retro races I have seen did produce a lot of good close racing.

    Speed crazed scratchbuilders must have existed long enough to create laser cuts and wing cars. I guess I missed the boat. I want to scratchbuild and I want to go fast but, I can't very well scratchbuild a wing car. Besides, I don't want to go that fast.

    I began racing in 07 after not touching it since about 69

    I've cast about for some history on where Eurosports Wingcars and cobalt motors came from but, so far the guys who must know aren't on these boards or they aren't very talkative. The history I do find is all about the "golden era."

    My retro-pro cars are ready should the occasion arise but, in the meantime, I'll see if I can build an inline or two.
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

  11. #11
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    When I heard brass, wire retro. I dug all my OL' stuff out and built one. Then I read the rules and ..........I ended up using most of the parts in building " legal inline" cars..... Bummer. I have yet been able to see or race a retro pro....Some day.I hope...

    OLPHRT
    PHIL I.

  12. #12
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    Don, Sorry for the confusion. We were talking about current retro development and not from the 60s. I'm sure that from the 60s, slotcars developed equally on both coasts. However, when D3 and IRRA began the retro resurgance they developed along different tracks with differing intents. As a result, everything in IRRA went inline while SCRRA (split from D3) has more flexibility with mixed inline/anglewinder building allowed.

  13. #13
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    SpeedZone in NJ had 20 RP entries at their last Fall Brawl. Very fast. NO seals.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam pan View Post
    SpeedZone in NJ had 20 RP entries at their last Fall Brawl. Very fast. NO seals.
    That race was run using SCRRA rules. It was an outstanding addition to the usual IRRA lineup...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mid-Cal Racer View Post
    Tim, if you remember your D3 history, BOTH the Coupes and Retro 1/32's were given the choice to build either anglewinder or inline. The 1/32 inlines were restricted to 2.25" width, but the anglewinders could be 2.5". Builders naturally gravitated to anglewinders. The coupes were running together both inline and anglewinders. As it turned out, the anglewinders were winning the races. The rest is history. -m
    So what?? There's no point here! I just pointed out that "retro" still has MANY angle winder class's!

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