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Thread: Hudy tire truer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Central, Illinois
    Posts
    325

    Hudy tire truer

    Hey all,

    So from everything I'v read, the Hudy is not only the best, but more or less, the only good option for a tire truer?

    So then I've read about the "Knob Job" and that it's one of those things that you really shouldn't even consider doing with out?

    So the Hudy Tire Truer is ~$200, the "Knob Job" is a $50 upgrade sold separate, but if you but it already installed, the unit is ~$300-$325...

    Is there any reason to purchase the Hudy with the "knob job" already installed over buying the Hudy and "knob job" seperatly? Is there something better about it being installed already?

    What is the feasible usability of the tire truer witg out the "knob job"?

    Thanks!

    -TheChad

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    293
    Without the knob job you have no reference marks to return to
    The knob job does give you reference scales to return to every time for identical repeatable tyre diameters
    Definitely get it
    listen, study, spy, try, research, invent

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Homeless in Canada
    Posts
    212
    I just mark the original adjustment knob with a sharpie once I have the tire diameter I want. The Knob Job is nice but the final tire diameter may change due to the voltage you use, sanding drum wear (yes even the diamond one), rubber expanding due to heat etc….
    I measure the odd tire diameter when grinding a batch to double check.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    175
    Quote Originally Posted by TheChad View Post
    Hey all,

    So from everything I'v read, the Hudy is not only the best, but more or less, the only good option for a tire truer?

    So then I've read about the "Knob Job" and that it's one of those things that you really shouldn't even consider doing with out?

    So the Hudy Tire Truer is ~$200, the "Knob Job" is a $50 upgrade sold separate, but if you but it already installed, the unit is ~$300-$325...

    Is there any reason to purchase the Hudy with the "knob job" already installed over buying the Hudy and "knob job" seperatly? Is there something better about it being installed already?

    What is the feasible usability of the tire truer witg out the "knob job"?

    Thanks!

    -TheChad

    I read your post on the price difference between a Stock Hudy TT and Triggerman KJ purchased separately vs an already assembled Unit. That's a very good question that any careful shopper should ask!

    First off I don't have any control what retailers charge for my products. All I know is my wholesale prices haven't increased since the KJ Kit was released in 2003.

    The Triggerman Pro is the name I give to an upgraded Hudy with the following mods:

    Drum and tire shaft squared up to minimize tire cone.
    KJ installed and calibrated to the customers choice of diameters.
    All bearings lubricated with a fine grease.
    All screws loc-tited
    A step machined into the Tire Shaft Pulley to eliminate rubbing against the aluminum swinging support.
    A Hub added to the 1/8 tire shaft that matches the Hub on the 3/32 tire shaft.
    Both hubs are engraved and painted with an index mark to make it easier to find the tire set screw after grinding.
    Rubber feet added to the top cover
    And a sheet magnet added inside the top cover for wrench storage.
    A custom laminated chart printed and installed on the drum cover.

    I other words, a turn key unit ready to grind tires to a specific diameter right out of the box!

    I also provide a second level upgrade called the Triggerman Elite.
    It comes with all of the above plus the Screw Job precision width adjuster.
    Naturally that costs more so beware when comparing prices that your pricing the Pro Model

    All calibration measurements are made after the tire has been cooled with compressed air for at least 30 seconds.

    As far as drum wear, tire durometer and voltage? I was asked those very same questions years ago when the discussion of single vs dual tire truers came up . A study was done with varying voltages(speed) and durometers. The differences were negligible. Drum wear is an interesting topic. The smaller the drum gets from wear, the larger the final tire diameter will be.

    The absolute worse thing that can happen when grinding tires is making them too small!

    One way to minimize costs is to ask your track owner to order a tire truer from their favorite wholesaler and have the wholesaler ship it directly to me. An email to trigrman@rochester.rr.com will notify me that it's on the way and what services are needed. I'll perform the work and bill the track owner directly. This saves both time and shipping costs.

    I hope this long winded reply will help answer some of your questions.

    Dale
    Last edited by triggerman; 02-13-2015 at 07:26 AM.
    Talk is Cheap!!!
    Because Supply Always Exceeds Demand!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Charles Town, WV
    Posts
    1,252
    I have used Dale's services since the first day I purchased my Hudy, since Hudy's first hit the market and he developed his "knobs". If you race in multiple series that use tire sizes that range from .812 to say .680, his mods to the Hudy are indispensable. His work is right the first time; his service is prompt. I have never been disappointed and neither will you. If you have a Hudy and not had it tuned or modified by Dale you are missing out.

    Dale- You have a great product and outstanding service...

    Thanks...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Denton, Texas
    Posts
    198
    I don't have a knob job and I get by without it. I have a notepad in my box that has a "somewhat close" approximation of how many turns of the screw it takes to get a specific tire diameter. It's an imperfect world, including my somewhat close approximations, so I set the truer initially to a diameter somewhat larger than what I want, true down to there, and then measure the tire with calipers. Then it's a matter of truing down more, little by little, until I get what I want for a diameter. Yes, this takes time; but I get EXACTLY what I want in the end. I've run a retro series and I've had guys submit cars with undersized rear tires. When I call them out about it, they said "But that's a brand new set that I just trued up"(with a knob job). I'm sure the variance was due to factors explained above. Having said all that, hell YEAH I'd take a knob job if I had disposable cash for such!
    Let me know if you want to know my real name... it's not "Tex". LOL

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Dayton, OH
    Posts
    249
    I modified my own Hudy with the knob job (it wasn't hard and the instructions were great) and also added a diamond cutting drum. Once you have the numbers on the knob job indexed it easy to cut tires to any size you want or need.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Posts
    4,511
    Knob job, Hand job, Blow job - it's easy - it all works.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Central, Illinois
    Posts
    325
    Quote Originally Posted by triggerman View Post
    I read your post on the price difference between a Stock Hudy TT and Triggerman KJ purchased separately vs an already assembled Unit. That's a very good question that any careful shopper should ask!

    First off I don't have any control what retailers charge for my products. All I know is my wholesale prices haven't increased since the KJ Kit was released in 2003.

    The Triggerman Pro is the name I give to an upgraded Hudy with the following mods:

    Drum and tire shaft squared up to minimize tire cone.
    KJ installed and calibrated to the customers choice of diameters.
    All bearings lubricated with a fine grease.
    All screws loc-tited
    A step machined into the Tire Shaft Pulley to eliminate rubbing against the aluminum swinging support.
    A Hub added to the 1/8 tire shaft that matches the Hub on the 3/32 tire shaft.
    Both hubs are engraved and painted with an index mark to make it easier to find the tire set screw after grinding.
    Rubber feet added to the top cover
    And a sheet magnet added inside the top cover for wrench storage.
    A custom laminated chart printed and installed on the drum cover.

    I other words, a turn key unit ready to grind tires to a specific diameter right out of the box!

    I also provide a second level upgrade called the Triggerman Elite.
    It comes with all of the above plus the Screw Job precision width adjuster.
    Naturally that costs more so beware when comparing prices that your pricing the Pro Model

    All calibration measurements are made after the tire has been cooled with compressed air for at least 30 seconds.

    As far as drum wear, tire durometer and voltage? I was asked those very same questions years ago when the discussion of single vs dual tire truers came up . A study was done with varying voltages(speed) and durometers. The differences were negligible. Drum wear is an interesting topic. The smaller the drum gets from wear, the larger the final tire diameter will be.

    The absolute worse thing that can happen when grinding tires is making them too small!

    One way to minimize costs is to ask your track owner to order a tire truer from their favorite wholesaler and have the wholesaler ship it directly to me. An email to trigrman@rochester.rr.com will notify me that it's on the way and what services are needed. I'll perform the work and bill the track owner directly. This saves both time and shipping costs.

    I hope this long winded reply will help answer some of your questions.

    Dale
    Dale, thank you for the reply! So there IS a difference from buying it already installed and buying it seperatly..

    -TheChad

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Citrus Heights, California
    Posts
    291
    Indispensable addition to the Hudy.
    Michael Colvin

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Central, Illinois
    Posts
    325
    Okay guys, I bought a used Hudy Tire Truer w/knob job kit. The knob job was installed by an end user not by Dale (Triggerman)..

    With the knob set to "0" I trued a tire to .761". Is there a way to make a chart from that? Does each # on the knob change by X amount?

    Palm_dog sent me a home made chart, but it shows .761" being "7", so that's not right, unless I'm doing something wrong!?

    *** Edit *** I just look at a triggerman chart on google, and it looks like his chart shows on turn 3 "0" as being .762", so that would be accurate and it shows each # on the dial is .007" difference?

    Obviously the knob has 0-9, then starts over, how do you know where to start? is there a way to know what turn # you are on? 1st turn, 2nd turn, 3rd turn?


    Also how does everyone measure the tire's final diameter? I used a caliper and when tire had just enough resistance to not fall threw the caliper arms that's the reading..


    Thanks!

    -TheChad
    Last edited by TheChad; 03-15-2015 at 11:14 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    175
    Chad,
    Due to Hudys manufacturing tolerances, and my own inaccuracies, EVERY chart is different. If you don't have a chart unique to your particular unit you'll have to calibrate yours. If you want to do it yourself, send me your snail mail address and I'll mail you printed instructions in the form of a manual. Or, send me your Tire Truer and I'll calibrate it and provide a chart for you for a charge + s&h.
    To find out the number of turns out all you have to do is zero the dial by rotating it clockwise until the screw can't rotate any further. The number on the dial should be close to "0". From there, rotate the dial back (counter clockwise) counting each time the dial passes zero. Think of it like a padlock. After passing the specified number of turns stop at the dial position specified on the chart.

    You seem to be using the right technique for measuring tire diameters. On additional thing I do once you get the tire to ALMOST Fall thru the caliper jaws is hold them up to a light. Look for gaps between the jaws and the tires. If the are any gaps, slowly close the calipers a .001 at a time until no light is visible. Use that measurement on your chart.

    Sorry for the delay in getting back to you. I was in Flordia enjoying some warm weather for the last two weeks.

    Thanks,
    Dale
    Last edited by triggerman; 03-16-2015 at 09:19 AM. Reason: Fixed typos and removed prices. Though I was answering a PM.
    Talk is Cheap!!!
    Because Supply Always Exceeds Demand!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Central, Illinois
    Posts
    325
    Dale,

    Thanks for the reply, no problem on the delay, I knew you were out of town!

    I'm glad you enjoyed your vacation! I bet Florida was beautiful!

    -TheChad

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