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Thread: Fuse

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    46
    John,

    That is good advice, removing one component at a time and testing the controller makes good sense, thanks.

    How about this explanation, the 20A fuse is there to protect the transistor(s) and everything outside of the controller handle and the 10A fuse is there to protect everything inside the handle INCLUDING the circuit board itself. I can envision some of the copper traces melting if a current larger than 10A went through them for very long. Every component inside the handle is designed for low currents the wiring, the resistors, the potentiometers, as well as the circuit board itself. The handle fuse stays!

    Jim Stevens

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Orange County, California
    Posts
    118
    Jim, that pretty much is the way I take it.
    The clear the air and make it easier for a slow wit(ME) to understand what you want to do, tell me what are you trying to achieve?

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    46
    John,

    I explained in my first post. When I race on a Gerding King track, and that is what I race on, I have found that I like my controller set at maximum brakes (set at 0 ohms) and the sensitivity pot set for as slow response as possible (set at 0 ohms). I only get to the brake contact/band when I am trying to avoid an accident and then I want to stop as quickly as possible. Upon restarts, I want the car to start smoothly and easily (like having the "mush button" depressed) so I don't "pop" anywhere. I see people unable to start on a straight let alone in a corner. As much as possible, I don't want that. Since I have my pots set at zero and have never been tempted to change either one I thought that I would eliminate them in my next build (there is ALWAYS a next build). My question was: if I eliminated the pots would I need the 10A fuse that hangs down from the handle? After much discussion (and thinking) I would say that, yes, I need that fuse. It probably doesn't save the transistor but it can save the circuitry in the handle.

    And, of course, I just like knowing how these things work!

    Jim Stevens

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    663
    For those of you that don't know Turkeyman he was a great innovator back in the 70s and 80s. We dragged him back in and he is going very fast with some fresh ideas. We are very happy to have him back.
    Skidmarks
    230 S. Averill
    Flint, Mi 48506

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    663
    So Jim, just glue the switches where you want them. Problem solved!
    Skidmarks
    230 S. Averill
    Flint, Mi 48506

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    46
    Jim,

    That would work but it is inelegant. I don't always achieve it but I do like clean, elegant solutions. Not only that but I want to make another controller!

    Jim Stevens
    Last edited by turkeyman; 04-15-2015 at 07:49 PM.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Orange County, California
    Posts
    118
    Jim Stevens, are you working with that board I sent back to you? Do you want to get rid of the fuse altogether or just don't like the dangle?
    Gonzo from Buena Park put the fuse holder on the board. It sticks out from the side above the left side screw boss on a DR-30.

    John

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    46
    John,

    I was looking to get rid of the fuse altogether.

    Yes, the internal choke controller I built is using the board you sent back, thank you!

    My thought WAS that without the potentiometers (both brake and sensitivity) I wouldn't need a fuse in that position. I had not thought through the possible damage to other parts of the circuit, including the circuit board itself, without having a fuse.

    I will use a fuse in the handle when I build my next internal choke controller.

    Jim Stevens

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural Ohio
    Posts
    28
    Have done some thinking on this, FWIW here goes.

    The whole idea of an electronic controller is adjustability

    By doing away with all adjustment the characteristics become those of
    a external resistor controller.

    Transistor becomes a source of power loss as opposed to just heat from the external resistor.

    Transistors blow up 100 watt resistors don't.

    If you are running the sensitivity at zero the resistor network needs to be
    changed to bring the pot back into the circuit
    Last edited by MikeB; 08-31-2015 at 02:44 PM.
    Mike Blevins
    serfprod@yahoo.com

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    46
    Mike,

    I disagree. For ME the real advantage of a transistor-based controller is a lighter handle and , perhaps more important, lower currents in the handle for less arcing and pitting on the circuit board.

    At the Nats several racers seemed to like the controller I built. They liked the simplicity and weight of the handle. Perhaps I am not alone?

    Jim Stevens

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural Ohio
    Posts
    28
    Wasn't saying get a resistor controller. Just that without the sensitivity pot the two type of controllers would have similar driving characteristics
    Agree on the weight and arcing
    Making the point that if the sensitivity is at zero, I would change the resistors to make it adjustable again.
    Mike Blevins
    serfprod@yahoo.com

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    46
    Mike,

    I really LIKE the characteristics of the controller without a sensitivity pot and, yes, it does act like a resistor controller. Not that there is anything wrong with that! In effect my (non-existent) sensitivity pot is at "0 ohms". Yes, if I wanted different characteristics I would have to change the values of the resistors, but I don't.

    Jim Stevens

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Canton
    Posts
    201
    Got a schematic for us?
    "Ever onward."

    Nelson Swanberg

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    46
    Nelson,

    I don't feel comfortable providing a schematic for my controller. I copied an 18 band Ruddock DR40 that I purchased. Dan Ruddock who developed it and now John Anderson who purchased the business from Dan own that design. I hope I haven't infringed too much on their property. It seemed the only way to get what I wanted since I have been led to believe that John doesn't want to build any Chokemaster controllers at this time.

    The only thing at all "trick" about my controller is the circuit board, which I made. It has no provision for the two 'pots' (no traces on the board and no through holes) so it is a bit "cleaner" looking. The only knob is the choke.

    Jim Stevens

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Orange County, California
    Posts
    118
    I don't have any problem with you building a controller for yourself.I would have problem if you built them for sale to other racers. I am currently putting together the HO controller and then the Choke/Master would be next.

    John Andersen
    DR Racing Products

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