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Thread: Soldering 16D can bushing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Lafayette, CA
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    Soldering 16D can bushing

    I'm "attempting" to learn how to build S16D motors. I notice with the new PS 16D when I solder the can bushing (using only a shaft to maintain alignment) that the original arm will no longer fit. When I replace the original arm with it's original spacers still in place, I find the arm now pushes up against the can bushing and endbell bushing. I.E., by soldering the can bushing I have reduced the space between bushings and I am forced to remove spacers to allow the arm to spin freely.

    Is this normal? Am I applying an incorrect bushing soldering technique which allows this to happen? Maybe I just need to realize that the arm must be re-spacered after can bushing soldering.

    I'm thinking I should be using a slug instead of just a shaft and use the slug to not allow the can bushing to intrude into the can.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    you just answered your own question.
    Russ Toy
    I am team burrito and I approve this message.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    St Charles, Illinois, USA
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    Two issues. 1) Is the shaft aligning the bushing with the endbell reinstalled and tightened? Really do not need to take the armature out, but you do need to clean and neutralize all flux before oiling and running. Are all of the edges deburred and flat?
    2) Is the slug you plan to use a snug slip fit in the magnets in order to CENTER the shaft?
    l.d. kelley, M.A. Ramcatlarry@aol.com

    60 year pin 1959-2019
    Racing slot cars in America
    USRA 2019 member
    IRRA, ISRA/USA, Hardbodies 1/24 &
    1/32 - Great Lakes Slot Car Club
    retired raceway owner 1992-2007
    Omni/Cidex service center

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
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    To answer your questions:
    1) Yes, endbell is reinstalled and tightened.
    2) Are all the edges deburred and flat? I'm not clear. Edges on the slug? Endbell? Can? Please clarify.
    3) The slug I have is not a snug fit. The magnets are glued to the can but have not been positioned. In terms of snug fit, would a .560 slug be considered correct [snug fit] for PS 16D can?

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Wellington, New Zealand
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    Try adding individual layers of tape to the slug until it nestles firmly between the magnets

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    All cans are punch pressed and have a sharp 'burr' on one side. If that burr is inside the can, it needs to be chamfered or reduced since the bushing usually has a slight radius interfering with the burr location. You want the bushing FLANGE to have direct contact with the can for the solder - not to have solder on just the hole and boss of the bushing. Like 'bedding the barrel' in the rifle stock. Basic blueprinting.

    EVERY motor is different, and while they might be similar in size. the quality control is not perfect, so taping the slug is the easiest way to avoid buying slugs in every decimal combination - or buying hones to make the finished magnet air gaps the same.
    l.d. kelley, M.A. Ramcatlarry@aol.com

    60 year pin 1959-2019
    Racing slot cars in America
    USRA 2019 member
    IRRA, ISRA/USA, Hardbodies 1/24 &
    1/32 - Great Lakes Slot Car Club
    retired raceway owner 1992-2007
    Omni/Cidex service center

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Beautiful Melbourne,Australia
    Posts
    44
    P/S cans usually have metal dags on the inside where the motor mounting holes are drilled. To make sure the bush or bearing seats against the can,I put 2 or 3 phenolic spacers on the slug shaft. That way you are guaranteed the bush/bearing is flush and the slug is not getting caught on anything.

    Cheers,PJ

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramcatlarry View Post
    All cans are punch pressed and have a sharp 'burr' on one side.
    I use a reamer to open the hole slightly, so the bushing or bearing can fit in easily. Then I install a motor slug with a bushing as a spacer, along with the endbell in a small drill vise, upright. Apply a little acid flux & solder in the bushing. Spin the can around for complete, even coverage & you're done. I do this to all my motors. Simple.
    Russ Toy
    I am team burrito and I approve this message.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
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    I'm slow so this has taken me a while to figure out. My can soldering technique was fine and thanks for the review and suggestions! I've learned that I'm just currently dealing with the new (likely, new to me only) generation of Pro Slot S16D motors. They are installing big, fat brass spacers on each end of the armature. The motors don't need to be centered on their magnet or spacered correctly since they are designed to "ride" with the spacer contacting the inner portion of the endbell bushing or can bushing. Consequently, any changes, blueprinting the motor or soldering the can bushing, end up with the armature having no space to spin freely. So, I'm now pushing the big spacer on the can end of the armature towards the stack creating lots of "room to move". I re-glue the magnets deeper into the can so that the armature can spin freely and still allow proper positioning of the brushes on the commutator. I then spacer as necessary to get the correct fit.

    It is interesting what a turd these motors can be if left intact. It's also interesting how much quicker they can be with a little work. I guess that's what slot cars are all about!

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