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Thread: DiFalco Power Transistor Replacement

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    206

    DiFalco Power Transistor Replacement

    I have read before about trying to find out a replacement for a DiFalco controller , mine went out and my local track did not have one ( I did order the correct DiFalco replacement) I went to the local electronics store and after reading about power transistors that will work I bought a NTE251 it was suppose to me a PMD16K100 but they did not have one so he gave me the NTE251 , the controller seems to work the same , I am by no means a electronic expert and I am surprised I fixed this or at least till the correct DiFalco one arrives , by reading previous discussions I guess it is very important to have the right ones but again my controller works fine with the NTE251 , I will how long it lasts.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    stockbridge, mi
    Posts
    760
    I have the Motorola transistors aval. Through skidmarks raceway or Jeff Sarkisian we have had excellent luck with these and their extremely hard to blow. My 11 year old used to be the best at hooking the controller up wrong that's why we found the higher quality transistors(have yet to have one blow in 4 years). These retail for 12.95 through the track.
    Give me my glue bottle!!!!!!!!!![B]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Orange County, California
    Posts
    118
    The Nte251 is a darlington pair. Is the what you want? Dan Ruddock didn't use the darlington because there were some residual issues after shutting of the power. He used an NES transistor for the old DR-40 .

    John Andersen
    DR Racing Products

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    somewere on the planet Tralfamadore
    Posts
    24
    There are two things that are important in selecting a power transistor. First is wether it is a PNP or NPN, which is what determines the current flow through the transistor, the second is current capability. Secondarily to the previous is wether to use a bipolar or darlington. While the bipolar has a lower saturation point they intrinsically have a bit lower current capability. Darlington's have a higher current capability but a have a lager saturation voltage, so they can be "slower", and turnoff/off voltages are higher. Darlington's really work best in power supplies. Here's a link that explains it a bit better: http://ecee.colorado.edu/~bart/book/...ter5/ch5_9.htm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    206
    Thanks for the info.

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