.

.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 22

Thread: Can Am chassis, motor - what to use?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    35

    Can Am chassis, motor - what to use?

    Ok, so I have read through posts here and the gist is this is about building your own cars so go get the piano wire and brass rod and get to work.

    Truth is it's been about 40'some years since I did that exact thing. And as much as I like to think I was good at it, I sucked. Oh, I tried hard and loved the time spent but results were lacking.

    So, rather than repeat all that wasted time and effort I would like to get involved but I need a formula and direction. I want to race on Eddies flat track where I'm currently racing on the king with Cheetah 11's, X25's, etc. I don't have interest currently in NorCal except for this retro racing. The rules, needless to say, are arcane and I don't pretend to grasp them all. That being said, I'm willing to try if the can get direction. Eddie said"oh, they have tons of crazy rules. Go ask them what you need. "

    So, here I am. I want to start at CanAm. What "kit" complies best with your rules both in specifics, intent and compliance? What motor chassis combination should I choose? The body list is clear and concise. Look, I don't need my soldering iron held for me but I have to have a solid place to start and a solid place to work from.

    So, if this is a private club and you don't need anymore participants I will happily remain with my laser cut production products and go on my way. If someone is willing to give me some specific direction I want to give this a try. Thanks!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Denton, Texas
    Posts
    198
    Make it easier on yourself and buy an RTR from someone first. That way, you can be racing quicker. While at the race, you can scope out the other chassis' and get ideas about what you might try.
    Let me know if you want to know my real name... it's not "Tex". LOL

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Denton, Texas
    Posts
    198
    Also, the motor will be dictated by what rules your local retro racers run under. You might be using something like a Falcon 7 or JK Hawk Retro. Or you might be using a Pro Slot 4002B "Puppy Dog". Or a Pro Slot 4002FK. YOU won't have a choice... your local rules being raced under dictate that.
    Let me know if you want to know my real name... it's not "Tex". LOL

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    St Charles, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    2,319
    Either JK retro kit will work. Get a Radio Shucks nibbler and trim the excess fat from them. ...and a basic soldering fixture.
    l.d. kelley, M.A. Ramcatlarry@aol.com

    60 year pin 1959-2019
    Racing slot cars in America
    USRA 2019 member
    IRRA, ISRA/USA, Hardbodies 1/24 &
    1/32 - Great Lakes Slot Car Club
    retired raceway owner 1992-2007
    Omni/Cidex service center

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    South of the City
    Posts
    1,054
    Start with the JK X25 retro kit (it practically build itself), add a JK retro hawk motor, gear it 9/29 & top it off with a Outisight Ti-22. From there, you can understand the fundamentals of chassis building. Come join us at Eddie's on April 17 for his first race of the year. Nothing too fancy here, just a bunch of old guys playing with toy cars.
    Russ Toy
    I am team burrito and I approve this message.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3,394
    Russ,
    Is the X25R OK for Nor-Cal Retro now?

    In the past, I know it wasn't.
    "Get Yourself Retrofied"
    Chicagoland Raceway
    17B West Ogden Ave.
    Westmont,Il. 60559
    Phone-708-203-8003
    mikeswiss86@hotmail.com

    Check out Chicagoland Raceway on facebook.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    South of the City
    Posts
    1,054
    Quote Originally Posted by swiss View Post
    Is the X25R OK for Nor-Cal Retro now?
    as much as it pains me & jim, it is now. we allow the r-geo kits, so we had to allow all the retro kits.
    however, real chassis builders do it from scratch. just saying.
    Russ Toy
    I am team burrito and I approve this message.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    35
    Cool. I was a "real chassis builder" back in the day when the only alternatives were Cox La Cucaracha and Chaparral aluminum chassis (had both) and that track hugging Cox BRM Formula 1 with real magnesium chassis. [This car worked so well with my thumb-drive Blue Cox 'troller.] While well intentioned, my built cars were seldom race winners and nobody was asking me to build for them. Also, I never had a chance against a very well stocked and highly developed Mura motor program that blew my doors (virtually everyone else, as well) off week to week. Back then it really helped if you had the resources to buy in quantity and carefully sort, coupled along with some great home armature winding. I coveted that pile of yellow motors, one better than the other, they had to draw from. No sealed motors intruding on that dynasty. That was when all you had to do was look hard at magnets and they could lose their charge.

    I'm not too proud to take the easy way out and go with a X25r chassis kit. I love the "experimental" sounding name. Retro hawk? Looks like one of those self-contained things. I have no experience with those. I guess it's simply solder and go. Evidently motor building takes the back seat to piano wire bending. Maybe the rules committee had to compete with a monster Mura program back in the day.

    Any jig suggestions or is this simple enough it falls into the "any" category.

    Thanks!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    South of the City
    Posts
    1,054
    Quote Originally Posted by gc4895 View Post
    Evidently motor building takes the back seat to piano wire bending. Maybe the rules committee had to compete with a monster Mura program back in the day.
    The concept is to build a chassis around a disposable motor. It takes the horsepower factor out of the equation & the emphasis on driving.

    Any jig suggestions or is this simple enough it falls into the "any" category.
    I like using the honeycomb solder block; you can get this from Amazon or eBay. Another handy tool I use is the mini torch, your solder joints will be so flow much better. So, stop your yakking & building something already!
    Russ Toy
    I am team burrito and I approve this message.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Denton, Texas
    Posts
    198
    Both RGEO and Precision Slot Cars make retro building jigs.
    Let me know if you want to know my real name... it's not "Tex". LOL

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    35
    Looking at the chassis photos these are very, very familiar. If I remember correctly, describing them as at best handling like a bad flexi is likely quite accurate. [It certainly fits with my memory.] When I first started back slot racing I started with wing cars. Wow, pure joy. Screaming fast and you can phone in the driver input. Then, I was introduced to the new generation of skill cars and wings, for me, were out the window. Love the skill cars. I just built a JK 11 that runs like a wing car on a king track. Simply amazing.

    And now, I'm going full circle back to 1968. How crazy is this!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    35
    So, you start'em on a jig and then go to the honeycomb solder block? I never saw one of these before but they don't appear to have what you need to maintain alignment. Maybe I'm misunderstanding correct us of this honeycomb. I just checked it out on Amazon. Have you a preference in mini-torches? There are only about 20 to choose from.

    When I was a kid I used to dream of torching the solder joints but these cool tools weren't available to me then....

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    35
    Oh, come on. I'm not looking to start a fight. I'm just looking for a really slow, poor handling, heavy car with a thick body that requires lots of walking from the driver's station to the far corner on the track when it de-slots for no apparent reason. Sounds like retro is my ticket. Nothing new here. I have walked this floor before and go into this venture with my eyes open!!!

    Please. Enjoy whatever aspect of the sport you find that fits your needs!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    mechanicsville Virginia
    Posts
    364
    Go for it gc....I can relate. I too scratchbuilt in the 60s as a middle-schooler and have recently taken up Retro because I like the challenge and I like scratchbuilding. Flexys are fun but not much of a challenge. Wings are too fast for me.

    Looking at all the retro chassis designs you see a lot of variety even among the winners and you wonder what is the key. Here's my first glimmer of an hypothesis: 60/40 weight distribution rears/guide, ample twist-o flex but it must be damped. People are putting vibration control tape around the chassis to that end. The point of the wishbone is to add longitudinal stiffness without reducing twist. Also the slip joints have a damping effect.

    But how do you know if a chassis is well damped since resonance is complex and not easily observable? You don't, except to try it out and make assumptions. challenging.

    For the rule makers and the retro experts I ask: why is a centerline hinge against the rules? I think a centerline hinge would be the hot ticket. The front and rear would be fully independent, they would both sit on the track without tension between them, no tendency to get tweeked. As long as the travel/twist is limited and damped I think I would work.

    Related question: were they ever built with a centerline hinge? Did it work so well it had to be outlawed? Is it legal for Can Am Plus? (I'll go check)
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    South of the City
    Posts
    1,054
    Quote Originally Posted by dlatch View Post
    For the rule makers and the retro experts I ask: why is a centerline hinge against the rules? I think a centerline hinge would be the hot ticket.
    It's not legal in D3, so it's not legal in NorCal. Your thinking is going to get you in trouble.
    Russ Toy
    I am team burrito and I approve this message.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •