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Thread: has anyone tried epoxy to bond a unplated chassis

  1. #1
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    has anyone tried epoxy to bond a unplated chassis

    I'm sure someone has to have tried to bond steel pillow blocks and a motor brace to a unplated chassis before.I know it might be a total crap shoot but even just for testing purposes has anyone had any luck with it?
    I've used adhesives in the past on big things that made a joint that was stronger then the 2 parts alone but I dont know how it would work on a chassis where the area to bond is so small.

    I've got access to a CNC router that could easily cut 99% of a chassis no problem in our machine shop so i figured it might be worth a try to see what happens.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    that's a dumb idea, stick with solder. it works.
    Russ Toy
    I am team burrito and I approve this message.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by team burrito View Post
    that's a dumb idea, stick with solder. it works.
    Cant solder without plating and the material cant easily be plated.

  4. #4
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    So many modern slot car frames are spring steel and are laser cut or wire EDM - not routed. CNC milling could be used for aluminum (and epoxy glued) or brass (best soldered). The hardness and delicacy of the cuts will make for likely failures. Soft brass never seems to hold- up for long - and if it is from a coil, it has bad memories and 'grain'.... I have seen experimental frames of carbon fiber with glued in metal motor boxes and pillow blocks.
    l.d. kelley, M.A. Ramcatlarry@aol.com

    60 year pin 1959-2019
    Racing slot cars in America
    USRA 2019 member
    IRRA, ISRA/USA, Hardbodies 1/24 &
    1/32 - Great Lakes Slot Car Club
    retired raceway owner 1992-2007
    Omni/Cidex service center

  5. #5
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    Ramcatlarry,I've been granted access to some Titanium plate that is left over from a experimental aircraft my boss built.He saw a couple of things I was working on and said to have at it and is actually interested in it.There is enough material to make a half dozen or so chassis from the one piece and maybe a dozen from the thicker material (can be milled down if need be).I know EDM is the way to go but if I can scrounge up some pillow blocks and rear brace from a existing chassis I can use the equipment we have on hand.I already cut a Slick 7 copy to test it and while the aluminum alloy I used is butter compared to what they use it worked well as proof I can cut it(I only did it for testing and no intentions to copy their design)

    The issue is plating titanium isnt easy and the companies we deal with cant do it and that was as far as I got before the holiday.
    If I could run a few test designs and get away with epoxy till I find someone to plate them and a design I like it would be nice but the more I look the more plating really looks like the only real option.

  6. #6
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    You could always tig weld it but that doesn't make for easy motor changes.
    Give me my glue bottle!!!!!!!!!![B]

  7. #7
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    BigMike,I dont think too many tracks would like me to set up a purge chamber to weld titanium in the pits..............lol

  8. #8
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    Titanium is an interesting medium. Most of the drag racing and wing racing and retro racing suppiers make pillow blocks and in the retro case, motor axle brackets. Many of the true scale Japanese and European community still SCREW together many of their frames. Many options could reveal themselves.

    Got some Titanium10-32 guide flag nuts years ago. Heavier than aluminum, lighter than steel, and more costly than I needed to invest.

    Never tried to bond it, myself. Soldering requires at least a 'tinning' to create a bond - as does unplated mild steel. A welding supply house found the right flux and fill for me to solder aluminum in the 1960's, you never know what you might find in the strangest places.
    l.d. kelley, M.A. Ramcatlarry@aol.com

    60 year pin 1959-2019
    Racing slot cars in America
    USRA 2019 member
    IRRA, ISRA/USA, Hardbodies 1/24 &
    1/32 - Great Lakes Slot Car Club
    retired raceway owner 1992-2007
    Omni/Cidex service center

  9. #9
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    Ramcatlarry,it definitely is different than aluminum or steel that is for sure.It really only makes sense to use where you can use less of it and have the strength make up the difference.Like the guide nuts you used as a example.

    I have a few calls out today to some plating shops,if it doesnt cast a fortune I may just go ahead and have it plated for soldering.

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