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Thread: controller needs high current testing

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    controller needs high current testing

    I built of few of these over the last year or so. I think this version is ready for prime time. I won some small races with its cousin on the G4 with motors through s16 but never got to test it with cobalt.

    Who's got a serious flat track and some big motors (ES24) that will test this for me? I'll send it to you with a return tag. Keep it as long as you need to give it a good test or until you blow it up.

    any takers?
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    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

  2. #2
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    Here is a short video of it on the bench

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TL6Dyu0SzQ
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

  3. #3
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    Feb 2005
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    Irvine, CA
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    I'm a taker for this test! I can test on the Buena Park Raceway flat track, and I have ES24 cars with motors up to 19T25 plus some ES32 and Euro F1 as well. I can also run comparisons with a number of different controllers too, as I have a Ruddock Chokemaster, Carsteen, the British TrueSpeed, DiFalco, etc. Let's talk via PM if you're interested.
    Dennis Samson

    Scratchbuilding is life
    Life is scratchbuilt

    Samson Classics

  4. #4
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    Thanks to everyone who offered. I am going to send it to Dennis. I would love to get input from all of you but I have a sentimental connection to Orange County CA so that tipped the scales. Besides, it is a scratch built controller.
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Irvine, CA
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    Don's controller arrived here yesterday for the big test session.

    Initial comments are basically "WOW"!

    What a beautifully made item, so professional in the way it is made and finished, it looks like a high-end production piece.

    The trigger action, being non-contact, is super smooth and free and the settings are easy to work with, although as a right-handed driver, I would prefer the knobs on the underside of the boards to give easier access while driving.

    I ran the controller last night at BPR in the Flexi LMP class that uses Hawk7 motors, so not quite the "high-power" testing yet, but enough to show the potential of the controller. The range of settings is impressive and the brakes are fantastic. The brake and sensitivity knobs are multi-position switches so you don't lose the settings, and the choke pot has an "off" detent which is nice.

    More details later as I feed back the technical stuff to Don first, but this is an exciting development in US-made controller technology!

    Thanks for the opportunity to do this testing.
    Dennis Samson

    Scratchbuilding is life
    Life is scratchbuilt

    Samson Classics

  6. #6
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    Jun 2002
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    Wellington, New Zealand
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    Does it have a built-in battery?
    Zippity

    Wellington Slot Car Club's home page

    "Rules are written by FEAR; and that Racers are motivated by the Fear that somebody may have something that gives others an Edge." - Rocky Russo

  7. #7
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    Not that I know of, but since this unit is on loan I am not about to go opening the control box to find out.

    Why would it have a battery?
    Dennis Samson

    Scratchbuilding is life
    Life is scratchbuilt

    Samson Classics

  8. #8
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    No battery of course. That would be illegal. Maybe Zippity (Ron is it?) wonders how all those chips power up so quickly. Yeah...I don't notice any delay. Happy coincidence because there is no timing or turn on circuitry.

    One idiosyncrasy to be aware of, Dennis. it needs ground to work right. (as do most things) If you set the car on a powered lane before hook up (no one does that) and hook up the red wire last, the car will take off as soon as you connect both black and white. So as all racers do...hook up first. even when practicing alone like I have done.

    I wonder if any other fully electronic controllers will do that?
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

  9. #9
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    Jun 2002
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    Sorry. I wasn't trying to cast aspersions against your creation

    What got be confused was Dennis' comment: "The trigger action, being non-contact".

    I wondered if your controller worked like Eben's model with rotary encoders and a hall sensor.
    Zippity

    Wellington Slot Car Club's home page

    "Rules are written by FEAR; and that Racers are motivated by the Fear that somebody may have something that gives others an Edge." - Rocky Russo

  10. #10
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    It's an array of hall switches tapping a string of resisters to ground, one at a time, as the magnet moves over them.

    I have not seen Eben's model. Is there a link or a picture? I have been working on a single sensor approach but I am not there yet.

    Thanks for the good words so far Dennis, The magnetic wiper makes a good first impression.
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    Wellington, New Zealand
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    Don, look here

    I had a beautiful hall effect hand controller built by a local Kiwi racer. Sadly, it got stolen from the boot of my car 15 years ago
    Last edited by Zippity; 12-08-2017 at 07:54 PM.
    Zippity

    Wellington Slot Car Club's home page

    "Rules are written by FEAR; and that Racers are motivated by the Fear that somebody may have something that gives others an Edge." - Rocky Russo

  12. #12
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    Interesting thread, those guys are bright no doubt. I've heard that microprocessors are coming to controllers, at least in Europe. We will watch with interest.
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

  13. #13
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    Jan 2008
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    Good news Controller Talkers, my Hall wiper PWM can handle the nasty currents and emfs any motor spits out from hawks to hand builts to cobalt opens.

    But the review from Dennis is mixed. He liked the brakes and found the controller good for banked flexy racing; but not so much for anything more demanding. There are a few things I can do to make it better but, it will never rival the top products availiable. If I had a demanding track nearby I would probably buy a Carsteen. Expecially since I am indebted to Steen for a couple of tips that helped me get this thing working.

    Perhaps I will post the schematic and see if anyone can offer improvements. Make it an open-source project.
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Irvine, CA
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    Thanks to Don for sending me the controller, it was fun to test.

    I think he is being a bit hard on himself, there's a lot to like about his controller. The brakes are awesome, and adjust really well. The trigger stroke, while being a little on the long side (which no doubt can be corrected) is super smooth as there is no contact at all. Once Don gets a wider trigger fitted, the feel will improve even further, as the current trigger is a bit narrow for most of us who are used to Parma triggers.

    I found it easy to get a good setting for the local Flexi LMP class that uses Hawk 7 motors on the BPR Flat track, and I ran at or near my best pace after just a few minutes of practice. It was when I went to the higher-power motors of GT12 and Eurosport cars that I found some difficulty in getting a good balance between the choke and sensitivity settings. When I did get it right, the cars were ballistic, but the settings were so sensitive that it was a real hit-or-miss process, and difficult to replicate or adjust from one lane to the next. Then when I tried to run Retro cars, I found that the sensitivity setting left a dead band at the beginning of the trigger stroke that I could not adapt my driving style to.

    I believe that with some work, Don will sort out a lot of these items, and if he does, then his build quality will result in a super product.

    Dennis
    Dennis Samson

    Scratchbuilding is life
    Life is scratchbuilt

    Samson Classics

  15. #15
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    Virginia Beach, VA
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    Yes Don post the schematic.. IM interested to see it...
    Casey Scott

    Team Camen - PK Armatures

    www.theisrausa.com

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